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Plans filed for three new residential buildings at Tremont Street and Melnea Cass Boulevard

Rendering of proposed Drexel Village

Rendering by the Architectural Team.

The Archdiocese of Boston has filed detailed plans for a three-building, 217-unit residential complex at Tremont Street and Melnea Cass Boulevard in Roxbury on the grounds of St. Katherine Drexel Church.

The $130-million proposal, which calls for 202 apartments and 15 condos, would have 75% of its units rented or sold as affordable. The plans also call for the church to remain on the grounds and undergo renovations.

The plans, filed by the archdiocese's Planning Office for Urban Affairs and JGE Development with the BPDA, also call for new space for an existing ABCD daycare, a community room, some retail space and 60 parking spaces in an underground garage. Roughly 1.3 acres of the 2.5-acre site will be used for publicly accessible space, including walkways.

The Proposed Project's gateway prominence, as a key location in the Roxbury Cultural District, will showcase a dynamic combination of permanent and temporary public art that will celebrated the rich cultural diversity, history and heritage of Nubian Square.

The tallest of the three buildings would be 14 stories.

The proposal calls for planting new trees - and preserving existing trees on the site.

Map showing the footprints of the three buildings and the public access:

Publicly available space on the lot

The proposal calls for construction to begin in late 2025.

The proposal is the latest in a series of projects along Melnea Cass Boulevard:

Drexel Village filings and meeting schedule.

Neighborhoods: 
Topics: 


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Comments

File your plans with the City for the site.

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Aren't you supposed to wait for someone to complain before making an angry retort?

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Some of us don't have time for that! I can now wrap up here in the bathroom and get on with my day.

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in advance.

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I paid attention back in chem lab. ALL of my glassware is properly cleaned, handled, and stored - therefore, my retorts are never angry.

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I saved you from complaints about:

1. Lack of a dog park.
2. Too much parking!
3. Not enough solar panels.
4. Not enough bike racks.
5. SHADOWS!!!!!
6. Why isn't it 86 stories tall?
7. Why can't it all be affordable?
8 Why can't it be for veterans?
9. It's all going to be for illegals (Sorry that's the Globe / Herald comment section).

The Archdiocese of Boston's housing office has done a good job doing affordable housing in the area. Give them credit where credit is due.  

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The Archdiocese has done sometimes good, sometimes not-so-good in that department in the last 20+ years. This looks to be one of the better plans.
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...and so far as "credit where credit is due" - the word is the current parish community has been very involved in this proposal/planning. I suspect that was a positive influence on the product.

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premature expressionitis, but is otherwise correct in his assessment.

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give me a break. the extent of his online persona can be summed up as such: No one should complain about the things that I like. Further, I will complain about the things I don't like and no one should argue with me.

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and it worked.

Congrats!

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he’s totally kidding around

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I was curious what the name of that church was.

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...lemme see if I can remember this correctly...
That building was built for some other denomination (and might have gone through a couple of different congregations).
The Catholic Church acquired it as a tradeoff when urban renewal took the original Saint Francis de Sales parish church (somewhere a couple of blocks towards the O'Bryant High School). This building became the second Saint Francis de Sales.
At some point after that, the Archdiocese merged this parish with Saint Phillip Parish. The Saint Phillip site was closed (and became Rosie's Place). The two became a hyphenated parish: St Francis de Sales - St Phillip.
At some point after that (the early 2000s Reconfiguration, I think), the Archdiocese took this hyphenated parish and the previously-hyphenated St John - St Hugh Parish on Blue Hill Avenue (Saint Hugh building at Grove Hall, Saint John building (further north) had been torn down some time years before that and replaced with senior housing), suppressing the previous parishes and erecting Saint Katharine Drexel Parish - using the Saint Hugh building as the main parish church and the Saint Francis de Sales building as chapel/offices/afterschool/etc...

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For years it use to be the St. Francis de Sales church.

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the other St. Francis de Sales up to the hill in Charlestown.

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