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Starting Monday, you're going to want to wear bright orange in much of the Blue Hills, because hunting arrows hurt like the dickens

Hunting in the Blue Hills

Yellow areas are where bow-and-arrow hunting will be allowed.

The Friends of the Blue Hills alerts us that DCR will be allowing limited bow-and-arrow hunting in roughly half of the Blue Hills Reservation starting Monday and running through Dec. 2.

General public access for recreation will NOT be restricted in those areas in which hunting will take place. Members of the general public who choose to enter those areas in which hunting will be taking place are advised to take proper precautions by wearing blaze orange clothing, vests, and hats.

Hunting will be allowed in Fowl Meadow, but not the part that extends into Boston, where hunting of any kind is never allowed.

Neighborhoods: 

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Comments

What could POSSIBLY go wrong ???!!

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Voting closed 26

Lots of it. That's all that's gone "wrong" so far in the Blue Hills Deer Management Program.

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Voting closed 14

He have WAY too many of them around and if a few got arrowed, that would be OK with me.

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Voting closed 44

That headline made me laugh out loud for some reason. Good one @adamg.

What exactly will they be hunting?

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Voting closed 10

They ate all my tulips and my wife picked up Lyme.

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Voting closed 30

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Voting closed 10

Here's your chance for sweet, sweet revenge.

Honestly, the logistics of dealing with a large dead animal full of blood seems like the worst part of hunting by a landslide. Catch a 15 lb. fish and it's no big deal. A deer? No thank you.

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Voting closed 19

Mine chases them out of my garden and yard. Just runs right at them and they scatter. Fifteen pounds of attitude is all you need.

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Voting closed 17

I was under the impression that bowhunters themselves wear camo, and not the orange kind.

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Voting closed 14

State regulations require at least a hat and probably 500 square inches of orange for all hunters: https://www.mass.gov/info-details/deer-hunting-regulations#blaze-orange-...

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Voting closed 15

Hunting is regulated by the state and I don't think it is prohibited in Boston by the city (correct me if that's wrong). I think it's just that the rules around not being able to hunt within a certain range of a house, in a park or other restrictions make it that there's really nowhere in the city that meets the requirement.

However, I have seen people duck hunting from a flat-bottomed rowboat with a blind set up on one side out on Boston Harbor and I think that would be legal.

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Voting closed 10

I feel pretty safe sharing the woods with bow hunters. Hunting with bow and arrow takes strength, training, and discipline; sighting a target, drawing and releasing an arrow takes time. Bow hunters are very unlikely to wheel around and fire off a shot when they hear something rustling in the brush or see movement out of the corner of their eye...

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Voting closed 15

because despite the greater care required with bow hunting, it's still easy to fixate on the target and forget about where that arrow might end up if it misses.

...but I can't imagine bow hunters would be any *worse* in that regard.

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Voting closed 10

An arrow doesn't keep going anywhere near as far as a rifle bullet. So, the odds of your being hit by a mis-aimed arrow are less than for a bullet. Also a rifle bullet can pass through an animal and hit another animal or person behind it, which I don't think arrows can do.

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Voting closed 9

n/t

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An arrow doesn't keep going anywhere near as far as a rifle bullet.

Absolutely correct; however, there is not a lot of rifle hunting in Massachusetts. Rifles are only allowed for bear, and you don't get a lot of bear east of the Connecticut River, and then there's the black powder season, which are technically rifles, but they don't shoot very far.

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Voting closed 8