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Don't forget to pick up some rubbers

Street scene in old Boston, featuring store selling rubbers

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can place this scene. See it larger.

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Charles C. Hutchinson, 154 State Street. ??

Don't know if that's this photo but the guy apparently sold chronometers out of that address. Seems likely given the visible "150" on the building.

https://www.skinnerinc.com/auctions/2804M/lots/205

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More info on Mr. Hutchinson:

https://www.vikingcompass.com/hutch.html

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That John Winthrop described as the "American Jezebel?"

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In 1916, New England Decorating Co was located at 134 State Street, and Charles C. Hutchison nautical instruments was located at 154 State Street.

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Dwight's Soda was baking soda

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If you blow up the image large enough, you can read "144 State Street" on the sign: second floor, between the windows, above the "Dwight's" towards the left edge of the photo.

The 150-152 State Street building is still there, although much altered:
https://goo.gl/maps/YNGMtvM54jTMDfMa8
(It's the sort of brownish building with big windows and the faux gable on top.)

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(n/t)

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Don't forget to pick up your binnacles, sextants, and transits.

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Like many young Navy Quartermasters, folks will be disappointed to learn that "sex tent" is actually one word, spelled differently than you think, not in fact a tent at all, and not used for what you think it's used for.

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Thanks for playing folks! This photo shows 144-150 State Street on January 29, 1902. Here's a link to the high res version: https://cityofboston.access.preservica.com/uncategorized/IO_2a55257d-ba8...

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Rubbers is what my grandmother called galoshes. And then in the 70s my classmates and I lived through the transformation of the word to be a prophylactic. Then the transformation in the 80s and 90s from rubbers to Trojans just like how tissues became Kleenex. Who remembers the jingle in the Trojan commercial ".....Trojan Man...!" ??

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Rubbers are waterproof shoe covers shaped like slippers. Galoshes are also waterproof shoe covers but they're shaped like boots. Both words can, and have been used interchangeably so your Grandma was correct.

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I have a vague memory that Boston is still a bit of a hub for maritime technology. Software or navigation devices or something. It's not the biggest industry, but it's important for the people who need it, and it has to be based somewhere. Am I remembering this correctly?

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