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How much would you pay to put the Boston city seal on a hoodie?

Official Boston city seal and the newfangled underlined B

Official old and newfangled Boston city symbols.

City Councilor Sharon Durkan (Back Bay, Beacon Hill, Fenway, Mission Hill) says it's time for Boston to set up a licensing office to all the companies just dying to show off their Boston cred on clothing, mugs and anything else you can slap a bold underlined sans-serif B or some good old-fashioned "Sicut Patribus Sit Deus Nobis" - or even just a design featuring the city-owned Faneuil Hall.

Currently, if you can imagine, anybody can slap a Boston symbol or design on a shirt and sell it without any recompense to the city, unlike in such world-class cities as New York, which have formal licensing agreements - and set payments - to stick their symbols and hearts and things on other things.

In 2009 alone, New York City made $24 million in licensing fees, Durkan writes in her request to the council to start the wheels turning on licensing deals.

Licensed merchandise featuring iconic Boston symbols, landmarks, and neighborhoods would foster a sense of pride among residents and visitors and offer a way for people to express their connection to the city.

Licensing agreements for City-branded merchandise would allow the City of Boston to earn revenue through royalties and/or fees, and when a licensed business creates and sells City of Boston-themed merchandise (such as T-shirts, hoodies, mugs, or souvenirs), the proceeds could benefit public goods and services via support to City of Boston departments.

As a popular tourist destination, City of Boston licensed merchandise would provide tourists with a tangible memento of their visit and a last reminder to visit again. Licensing encourages local businesses to participate in the production and sale of branded merchandise, which stimulates economic activity, creates jobs, and supports small businesses within the city.

She adds:

When people wear or use Boston-branded merchandise, it acts as free advertising, advancing interest in the city, its culture, attractions and thereby contributing to Boston’s brand visibility on a global scale.

Merchandise licensing presents the opportunity to collaborate with local artists, designers, and creators whose involvement would only serve to further community connections and celebrate the City’s creative talent.

Well managed licensing would be needed to carefully maintain the integrity of the brand and ensure that the merchandise aligns with Boston’s image and values, and cities around the country have proven that careful construction of a brand allows for continued production to remain authentic.

Details of the new-school Berthold Akzidenz Grotesk B that reps the Hub, as well as the palette of colors used on the city Web site: Freedom Trail Red, Charles Blue, Optimistic Blue and Snow White.

Neighborhoods: 
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Comments

They closed all the wrong city agencies today

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Voting closed 8

I’d buy the heck up of some City merch.

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Voting closed 8

This ship has said.

Had Boston done what New York did in late 70s with "I ♥ NY" advertising campaign, it would be making similar money today.

but now that you can go to cafe press or whatever is the hot new print on demand printer is today and get something slapped onto just about anything.

Kinda defeats the purpose. At least with "I ♥ NY" its a trademark (that can be enforced)

Of course the city could come up with a snazzy tagline like "Boston Strong"... oh wait..

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Voting closed 9

There's always this one:
IMAGE(https://static.wixstatic.com/media/b56c33_9ff8772779cc493f85cd34cd7e43bcc7~mv2.jpg/v1/fit/w_1000%2Ch_1000%2Cal_c%2Cq_80,enc_auto/file.jpg)

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Voting closed 7

There's already a Boston shirt. It's called a "Harvard sweatshirt".

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Voting closed 9

.

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Voting closed 8

Zero dollars

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Voting closed 9

That's all I wanted to say.

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Voting closed 7

While the new logo isn't terrible, I've always been partial to the Futura Black font that BEMS uses.

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Voting closed 8

I remember when Boston Police and Fire used it too. It's also still seen on I think Public Works trucks also.

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That's actually a variant of the state's color pallet, which state agencies are expected to use. These seem to be variants of base colors Bay Blue and Independence Cranberry.

Mayflower Style Guide for state agency websites

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Voting closed 7

Give me some of that Beantown merch!

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Voting closed 8

There's a lot of us who are waiting to see city officials and workers put their seal to work by cleaning up filthy sidewalks. And I'm not talking candy wrappers. Start in front of Valenti Way, Portland, Causeway. Just thinking of those sidewalks makes me want to vomit on top of someone's human waste.

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Voting closed 7

I've already paid over $70 for Boston branded merch, would have gladly got it from a city source if it were available. Come up with cool collab with our sports teams or artists, there are plenty already doing it that should be supported more.

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Voting closed 7