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Four shot, one dead in Roslindale

Boston Police report four people were shot around 3 a.m. at 784 Canterbury St.

One man, in his 30s, was pronounced dead at the scene. Two other men, in their late 20s, were found there with gunshot wounds and were taken to local hospitals. A fourth victim, also in his late 20s, got himself to a hospital.

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at the cemetery and nearby streets. No pun intended.

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[float=right]IMAGE(http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u129/KameronsMamma/gun-1.jpg)[/float]www.MayorsAgainstIllegalGuns.org has proposed Federal legislation that would help get illegal guns off the streets. Ask your Congressman, Senators and neighbors if they support it.

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My guns, they help to protect my family, property and liberty

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I enjoy a good action-adventure tale as much as the next person.

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Nice snark, dboy. That sort of talk/writing plays really well around here. Too bad he'll probably disappoint u because I bet protection - not engagement - is his thing. Hard to understand if u r not a gun owner.

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Please explain.

Maybe it makes you all tingly and all that ... but that doesn't constitute protection.

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Let's not pretend that defensive gun use doesn't happen, OK? I googled "homeowner shoots intruder" and tons of stories pop up, so clearly you're not looking. Here is one of the stories that popped up from March of this year:

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865551247/Sprin...

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perspective. These things are rare. You are much more likely to be killed in a car crash, and slightly more likely to die by a swarm of bees, than be a victim of armed home invasion. Even though you never hear high concern from the "be prepared" crowd.

Now, not arguing you should not be prepared, but you also have to be rational. While not clinical, quite a few friends that own multiple guns strike be as borderline paranoid with some of their rants. And that's not a good mix, especially for their own well being. Walking around in fear all the time at the chance of something so miniscule, always with your guard up, is harmful itself. It's not a life worth having IMO.

Anyways, I don't think most people are looking to regulate legal firearms anymore. But the argument that you can't regulate illegal arms and make laws designed to keep guns out of the wrong hands is ludicrous.

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Child shoots child with loaded/unlocked parent's gun.

Fearing intruder, man/woman shoots husband/wife/own child.

Person injured in accidental discharge of gun.

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You can't legislate common sense.

Here's the most common headline:

"Generations of a family own guns, shoot them for recreation and hunting, no one ever hurt."

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Home invasions are rare, but when they do happen, it's often a life or death scenario. Same with random gun violence. Unless you live in the wrong neighborhood or run with the wrong crowd, it's highly unlikely you will be harmed by a firearm. Living in JP, it's a concern considering past events in my neighborhood, but I don't lose sleep over it.

With regard to your friends, I know people like that in addition to people that think a gun is so dangerous they refuse to touch it or even be in the same house where one is safely secured. Both are borderline paranoid as you put it and represent extreme ends of the spectrum. Regardless, their personal phobias are irrelevant to the discussion.

Bad guys shouldn't have guns mmmkay. Unfortunately, proposed solutions for regulating "illegal arms" usually result in creating additional hoops that only the law abiding are going to jump through. I proposed some suggestions in another comment. Let's see yours.

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The ban really was really effective in D.C. and Chicago (sarcasm), the two highest handgun murder rates in the country. These laws only disarm the law abiding citizen. The real problem is that these mayors know these laws are ineffective but still insist on passing them so they look like they're doing something about the violence.

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Ban's don't work.

But meaningful gun legislation to keep guns out of felons and the mentally disturbed hands need cooperation from states with very lax laws. Those states usually will not cooperate, or the NRA is breathing down their neck.

There's a middle, common ground somewhere. But both sides will have none of it.

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Fair enough.

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You spam every single gun related thread with this. The Hello Kitty is pretty sweet though.

I checked out their website. The fact that they are pushing micro-stamping shows they have no idea what they are talking about.

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It is.

Mayors more than any other elected official deal with gun violence on the streets and in neighborhoods. Residents are pissed, they've lost their sense of security. They've witnessed accidental and intentional shooting deaths of family members, acquaintances, innocent bystanders and law enforcement.

When Mayors like Boston's Tom Menino and NY's Mike Bloomberg say illegal guns are a significant cause of violence and death, I listen. Mayors Against Illegal Guns .Org offers a variety of ways to mitigate injury and death. I think it's well worth our time to consider them, choose wisely and see if we can save a few lives. Who knows, it could be yours.

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and as I pointed out, Micro-stamping is a joke to anyone that understands how firearms are constructed. Firing pins are a wear item and break, thus, they are easily interchanged. It's like saying you have to put a car's serial number on it's muffler in case it falls off in an accident. Crooks would just carry older guns, swap out the firing pin, deface the firing pin, carry revolvers, etc. It's not going to do anything to stop criminal use of guns.

There's no doubt there are problems with gun crime in this town. Let's be honest about it though. In the vast majority of cases, the perpetrators are already known to police and possess the gun illegally. As other posters pointed out, gun crime is rampant in cities with some of the strictest gun laws in the country. It's time we try to address the underlying issues creating the violence instead of stacking on additional restrictions which have already proved ineffective.

Here are some of my suggestions:

- Address the war on drugs. People operating in the black market are going to use violence to control their turf and profits. Notice there aren't gun battles over alcohol such as during prohibition.

- Increase the penalties for being a felon in possession, etc. These are the guys committing the gun crimes. They should be up the river for a long time if caught with a gun.

- Community policing. It's not a mystery what neighborhoods, gangs and many individuals are involved in this gun violence.

- Change the culture. We certainly have a glorification of the gangster lifestyle in many parts of our society. There should be a stigma against being a violent felon. Unfortunately, many see this as something to aspire to. In addition, turn on the TV in the evening. During every time slot there will be at least one show on that will show guns in use by good and bad characters alike. It would be interesting to count how many people are shot on TV shows during a week or a month. Heck, even the shows I grew up on like Miami Vice, Magnum PI, etc. had tons of gun violence. How many times did Thomas Magnum get shot in the shoulder anyway? Somehow it never affected his tennis game.

When Mike Bloomberg talks about the size of soda drinks being a problem in his town and Menino spouts off about a Chick-Fil-A opening, I stop listening. These guys would ban any number of things if they had their way, so of course that's their solution to the gun issue.

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I think you have some good ideas here. I also think the conversation is really important. The more people talk about the problems and their ideas on how to fix it, the sooner we'll have elected officials who will know they're not risking their political careers by acting.

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Be adult enough to put your names with your comments.

The esteemed mayor of New York, who I have always admired, should be ashamed of himself for the policy he's supported of frisking / patting down hundreds of thousands - yes, hundreds of thousands - of innocent men in NYC for no other reason than they're the wrong color or live in the wrong neighborhoods.

Fuck his gun policies. That's not what affects the millions of people in his city nor does it affect what happens in ours.

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2000 murders a year! Washington D.C., a city the same size as Boston, was averaging 500! Boston peaked at around 175. Who do you think commit almost all these murders,John? I remember a while back Philadelphia had 21 shootings during Easter weekend. Young 'minority' males were the perps and victims in all of them. Chicago has become unbelievably violent with possibly the worse 'gun crime' in the country. Who do you think commit most of these violent 'gun' crimes, John? And John, Chicago has VERY strict gun control.

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That came BEFORE the stop and frisk policy, ducks. It had the most to do with the baby boom crime wave ending.

Sorry, but what NYC is doing is not only unconstitutional and chillingly intimidating in a democratic society, it is NOT effective policing. It is all part of the police state shakedown meant to keep "certain people" in their place with force and intimidation.

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But not for rising wages; falling prices had more to do with it.

People might bemoan the imaginary welfare queen, but they are right in everybody having their TV's, XBox's, and iPhones now.

Thing is, electronics and technology are no longer luxury goods, but are dirt cheap and prevalent. In terms of keeping up with the middle class Jones, The poor can at least have a little of life's luxuries they couldn't before. The new economic dynamic has helped lower crime.

Now imagine if we really could produce a wage raising, middle class, meritocracy based recovery?

Punishment has little influence on crime, cause ain't no one that believes they'll ever get caught. Especially criminals that think they're smarter than they are. The rising tide of economics, and legal ways to make a buck, actually do reduce crime.

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So isn't culture and genetics.

And is it unreasonable for victims to expect appropriate punishment? Never mind if punishment prevents crime, is it wrong for a rape victim [for example] to expect harsh punishment for her rapist? If you child [for example] was assaulted [murdered], you would be forgiving and not expect the perp to receive harsh punishment, because well, you don't think punishment has any effect on crime?

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what if 'certain people' do indeed commit a large and disproportionate level of violent crime? Just ignore it because it's un-PC and inconvenient to discuss it?

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have paved the road to an America so dumbed-down, so sheeplike in adulation of a culture of thuggery, we're going to be the hotel maids and gas station attendants to countries that have valued industry and innovation. My children's pathetic public education bored them sick: the curriculum carefully gutted so those without academic aptitude would be able to eventually graduate elementary school, but never skimping on tearjerking tales of heroic minorities. My great-grandparents would not have recognized US public education as I suffered it, but could they have seen the cruel joke it played on their great-great-granchildren, they would have returned to England, Scotland, Ireland, Germany and France.

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A generation or two ago, those would have been certain Irish and Italian and Greek and Portuguese people, no?

Why don't we start talking about the conditions people live in for once - since the "certain people" involve a revolving cast of characters rotating through the same roles on a generational basis.

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