Three teens and an 11-year-old charged with beating, robbing woman on Mission Hill

Boston Police report arresting two boys and two girls for an attack on a woman on Parker Street last night - three who kicked in the head her after they knocked her to the ground and one who videoed the whole thing.

Police say the four - ages 17, 14, 13 and 11 - went after the woman around 9 p.m. on Parker Street near Hillside Street:

The victim stated one of the males in the group shoved her to the ground before two additional members joined him in kicking the victim several times about the head and body while the fourth teen filmed the incident on a cell phone. The victim stated the suspects grabbed her cell phone and fled the area on foot. The statement from the victim was relayed to officers who were speaking with the group who were able to recover the victim’s cell phone from one of the teens. All four of the teens were taken into custody. While placing the suspects under arrest, officers received additional information that a second victim had also identified the group as his assailants from an earlier assault and battery in which the suspects kicked the victim before unsuccessfully attempting the steal the victim’s backpack.

The four - two from Mattapan, one from Roxbury and the 11-year-old girl from Dorchester - were charged with being delinquent for unarmed robbery and assault and batter by means of a dangerous weapon (shod foot), police say.

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Comments

Juvenile Court

By on

I feel bad for the victims they were robbed beaten and humiliated by these kids. Now the victims will have to loose several days pay while the case in juvenile court gets continued several times. After a year the charges will be dismissed because the victims get tired of spending all day in court. Either that or the Juvenile judge will sentence the kids to a summer camp or get them a summer job with the city.

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Voting closed 73

Yawn

By on

This is vicious, but trying children as adults is also vicious. Our society doesn't need to be more violent than it already is - and treating kids like adults and turning them into super violent evil people in "school of adult prison" makes our society more violent.

Get over yourself - science and centuries of experience say that you are full of crap.

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Voting closed 16

Yes

I'm sure doing nothing will defintely set them on the right path

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Voting closed 38

Who...

By on

Who, apart from you, said anything about "doing nothing"?

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Voting closed 15

For non-violent crimes?

By on

For non-violent crimes? Agreed 100%. But this is sociopathic behavior. We already know how this ends. Lock them up and throw away the key.

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Voting closed 22

Okay, but juveniles who commit such horrible crimes

By on

Okay, but juveniles who commit such horrible crimes should not be allowed to get away with such crimes just because they're juveniles. They need to be corrected before they go out and commit more crimes.

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Voting closed 13

But how?

Evidence shows that locking them up makes it more likely that they will commit similar crimes. It is complicated. The most important thing is to make the community safer. No 11 or 13 year old should be on the street at 9pm. Those 2 should be removed from their home, and placed somewhere they can be supervised. Unfortunately DCF doesn't have any placements left.

Foster homes have such a bad name, no one will consider doing it anymore.

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Voting closed 6

Yes and no

By on

As a parent, therapist, and child welfare professional of many decades, I can tell you some of this is correct, and some is not. Lockup programs for children do not help. But that's essentially what foster care is. It's actually worse in many regards. There is a shortage of foster homes, but DCF is also removing huge numbers of kids, most of whom don't need to be removed, as research shows that removals make things worse in most cases. The foster care model is also one in which parents are demonized, kids are told their parents are awful, kids in care are told by society that they're awful and are widely believed to be there as a punishment, and DCF makes little effort to work with parents and kids together to stabilize families and get kids home.

FWIW, DCF doesn't follow research; I've been on panels tasked with advising them as to the latest research and reviewing this. Their numbers and practices don't remotely reflect best practices, but there's no oversight and in reality, the workers largely do what they want and families have little recourse.

Oh, and have I mentioned the federal subsidies that exist for removing kids, but not for helping families to stay in place or for screening and deciding to leave them alone?

An 11 year old and 13 year old being outside at 9pm in and of itself is absolutely not evidence of neglect or poor parenting. My kids were often out of the house alone quite a bit younger than that. They might have been heading home from friends' houses, or the library, or orchestra rehearsals, or if it was summer, just being out hanging around. There is absolutely nothing wrong with any of this, and socializing and being outdoors are good things for kids.

As far as kids who are committing assaults, it's likely they've experienced considerable trauma. This was not necessarily inflicted by their parents. The leading causes I'm seeing of city kids these days are unnecessary removals by DCF, bullying at schools that isn't dealt with, abuse and harassment from teachers and school staff of kids with disabilities, and general instability faced by families because of poverty.

What we need is for kids to have stability and community. For them to stay in housing and schools for many years at a time. For schools to actively teach social and emotional schools AND hold kids accountable. The schools I visit tend to either be loving and caring toward kids who struggle with no expectations for them OR have expectations and accountability in a punitive militaristic fashion. Both models have the problem of largely savioristic attitudes from staff and administration. Trauma-informed schools need to have a solid balance of both, where kids are truly valued and adults treat them they way they want their own families treated.

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Voting closed 6

9pm on Mission Hill is not safe

Perhaps 9pm is too broad a generalization for you but, 13 is too young to be out in the city. There are too many risks and attractive dangers. If you mean on the front porch or the street in front of their house with a responsible adult present, then ok. I would never presume it was evidence of anything. I met an eight year old that begged me for money to eat at Downtown Crossing. He had grass stains on his pants and his neck was clean. I could tell he decided to ride the subway all day for adventure. And just because nothing bad happened to him, doesn't make it safe. I walked him home.

There is no such thing as a Foster Care Model.

A foster home is a placement in a home with other children. It is meant to be similar to a family home and located in the same community so that the child can attend the same school and same pediatrician. A foster parent sleeps at night. A foster parent is not a childcare professional. A social worker that has to place children somewhere different every night is not able to provide preventive services and work closely with parents.

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Voting closed 2

NOTHING WILL HAPPEN TO THESE

By on

NOTHING WILL HAPPEN TO THESE SUSPECTS IN COURT. Boston Juvenile Court is a joke. The suspects know this and will continue to break the law because they know there are no consequences for their actions.

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Voting closed 41

loose?

By on

Why is this such a big thing now, adding an extra "O" to lose? I get it when words & phrases get shortened, but making them longer? I never saw this before around a decade ago, but now I see it several times per day. It's like a bad meme or something.

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Voting closed 15

Geniuses

By on

They videoed their crime? How helpful for the police and courts.

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Voting closed 43

I know, right?

By on

So stupid to videotape. But also, it is disturbing - they videoed this so they can watch later and laugh about it?

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Voting closed 21

Oh they will see it over and over

By on

In court. In every hearing. Each time they deny what they did. Etc.

Going to be a very useful teaching aid for a posse of stupid little thugs.

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Voting closed 11

Huge taboo

One of the third rails of American politics right now is criticism of bad parenting.

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Voting closed 43

work

By on

parent(s) could be working 40+ hours and living in poverty, do you tell them to get a better job? if its multiple people being "bad parents" its not really an individual failing, is it?

i feel sympathy for the victims obviously but this is systemic

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Voting closed 13

Define Bad Parenting

By on

HINT: it isn't letting your 8 year old go play at the park.

HINT: it might have something to do with parents working double shifts to pay rent.

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Voting closed 7

pro free range

I'm all about the whole free range kids thing. I'm talking about bad parenting in that these kids thought that robbing and beating someone was the thing to do.

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Voting closed 19

Free Range is for rich kids

By on

Parents often have little choice but to leave kids in the care of older kids when they have to work randomly changing shift patterns and juggle multiple jobs.

Or just leave them at home with little way to to know where they are.

Note that this is not new - how do you think those organized crime outfits of the 1920s got all their recruits?

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Voting closed 7

I know, totally! It’s not

By on

I know, totally! It’s not like they just didn’t know any better. At age 11, 15 or 17, I can’t imagine thinking it was ok to physically assault someone, much less actually film myself doing so.

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Voting closed 1

Rent

By on

How about move to an affordable city....Worcester?

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Voting closed 4

Some people do

Worcester doesn't have the same job market - very high unemployment comparitively. Then there is the horrible public transit to deal with.

Not such a bargain to make $2 less an hour and have to buy a car, now is it?

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Voting closed 3

Worcester

By on

Okay then let them bitch about the high rent if they don’t want to move elsewhere.

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Voting closed 4

It may not even have anything to do with either of the above.

By on

It has to do with parents not bothering to teach their kids the difference between right and wrong. There are plenty of parents who work full time, OTOH, who do manage to take the time to bring their kids up on the straight and narrow and teach them the difference between right and wrong.

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Voting closed 8

Context

Have you ever had to take care of kids on a permanent full-time basis?

It really is not that easy.

Not easy for you, apparently.

It is VERY easy to teach kids not to rob people even while working three jobs.

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Voting closed 11

Just call the cops

By on

Seems to be the "in" thing to do - criminalize parenting that you don't like. Comes with an added feelz buzz when you get your neighbor arrested for letting their kids walk to school on on their own!

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Voting closed 7

you

likely never did anything your parents would have disapproved of. If you don't have any evidence of bad parenting, maybe don't jump to that conclusion?

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Voting closed 5

Don't Make Assumptions

By on

First and foremost I certainly hope that all the survivors of these crimes recover fully. As far as the bad parenting I must agree with Fest Daddy lol , no one here should judge anybody's parenting skills and lesson you absolutely know that is bad parenting skills. We shred stop prejudging people before all the facts are in

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Voting closed 3

What this indicates is that

By on

many kids (though certainly not all) are becoming more feral at a younger age. It's rather scary, to boot.

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Voting closed 5

No.

Not really. Youth crime rates peaked in the late 80s to mid 90s

There were huge pulses of these things during times of economic uncertainty - 1870s, 1890s, Great Depression come to mind.

This is nothing new at all - and vastly less common than at the peak of the baby boom.

https://letgrow.org/resources/crime-stats/

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Voting closed 6