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Patriots player charged with walking around Logan Airport with two loaded guns

Two handguns

WCVB reports Patriots player Jackie K. Jones, 25, was arrested at Logan Airport for the two loaded and unlicensed guns State Police say he had with him as he walked around Logan Airport yesterday afternoon.

State Police arrested Jones after the guns showed up on a TSA screening device as he allegedly tried to get on a plane to Los Angeles with the loaded guns in carry-on bags.

Jones faces arraignment in East Boston Municipal Court on charges of unlawful possession of a firearm, unlawful possession of ammunition and possession of a large-capacity feeding device - all felonies in Massachusetts. He also faces potential fines by TSA.

TSA reports:

Officers with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) at Boston Logan International Airport (BOS) on Friday detected two loaded firearms and ammunition in the carry-on luggage of a male passenger ticketed for travel to Los Angeles International Airport. This occurred around 5:20 p.m. EDT during the routine X-ray screening of carry-on luggage at the airport’s security checkpoint.

Upon discovery of the firearm, TSA notified the Massachusetts State Police and they responded to the security checkpoint. The traveler was questioned by law enforcement and subsequently arrested.

TSA said these were the ninth and tenth guns discovered in carry-on luggage at Logan this year. Also:

Firearms can be transported on a commercial aircraft only if they are unloaded, packed in a locked, hard-sided case and placed in checked baggage. Ammunition and firearm parts, including firearm frames, receivers, clips and magazines are also prohibited in carry-on baggage and must be checked. Any type of replica firearm is prohibited in carry-on baggage and must be transported in checked luggage.

Innocent, etc.

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Comments

Srsly. This causes Magoo to ‘member Aaron Hernandingledoogle. Magoo.

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Your schtick is well past its prime. Time to put it down son.

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You know what works on this site? Not reading what you don't want to read. I do it all of the time.

Adam, this site is great! I value this site, even with all of its trolls, and Magoo comments.

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Magoo is Adam. Adam is Magoo. Finkle is Einhorn. Einhorn is Finkle.

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Hernandez will be in the minds of Hayden, the prosecutors and the public

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Mister "Unknown"...

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Based on the number of likes it seems I am not alone when it comes to this tired Magoo schtick.

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most pro teams use private charters now. do these guys go through the same security steps or do half these guys have loaded guns on them? i seem to recall sebastian telfair being arrested at hanscom getting on board with a loaded pistol tucked into his pillow?

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Similar to driving. It’s wonderful

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n/t

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I've seen military guys travel with rifles and avoid arrest. There's a process to travel with firearms, but it requires reading and understanding rules. There's even a video to help gun owners: https://www.tsa.gov/travel/transporting-firearms-and-ammunition
But nooooo. This guy is like, "I'm going to walk right through there with my plastic lower gun and the metal detector won't see it...".

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Money can't buy you brains

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suddenly coming into pro-sports riches and fame without sober advice, which doubtless would have been in short supply from my similarly poor relatives and friends.

Every pro sports team should have professional counseling for its young stars to help them navigate their new status. Plenty of recent examples like Ja Morant suggest that doesn't exist: baffling, even if only considering the economic stakes.

The Pats are only on the hook with Jones for $4.4M; imagine how that lunkhead role-player feels that he put that at risk, and for what? The Grizzlies owe Morant a guaranteed $194M: one would think they might take a few basic, obvious steps to protect that investment. Nope, their best player is gone for the first third of the 2024 season. Insane.

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These teams are businesses hiring employees. They are not parents adopting children.
If someone is having trouble dealing with his newfound riches, he can hire his own counselors. All of these people are adults and therefore responsible for their own actions, stupid or otherwise.

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I never got how loose things were either. When you are talking about multi million dollar long term contracts you'd think they could slip in all sorts of stipulations designed to keep the players from self destructing. The players that seemed to get through it best had that structure around them. Like Gronk, his parents were very involved and he set things up so his salary was put aside but he could play around with his endorsement money. He tagged along with people like Brady instead of buying his own luxury jet. He even found a way to still not only party but get laid to do it lol.

It's crazy how many of these players end up with nothing after they go past their prime despite even the lowest paid players bring paid more than many CEOs. From both sides of the equation it seems like the sports industrial complex and players just literally pour money down the drain by not being proactive about counseling and adding support infrastructure in place to mold the players.

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Part of this orientation program involves financial experts and others who give presentations to the players about common traps to avoid (e.g. a rash of relatives and friends wanting you to "invest" in their business idea).

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You don't need the gun if the wealth isn't on your person. Do you see Warren Buffett walking around with jewelry? Why isn't this more widely understood? Unless, of course, he was planning on using the gun to extract wealth from, or harm, somebody else.

Even if you didn't grow up in a circle that's anywhere near sound advice on wealth management, didn't this fool ever see a Domino's vehicle which read "Driver carries less than $20?"

Retail banks have their flaws (and their injustices), but the biggest ones succeed in their efforts to keep your cash safe. And if you don't trust them, then just stick the $4M in the Dow Jones and/or Switzerland, and get a home in a nice community. There's no obligation to engage scumbags from your youth after you make yourself successful.

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… for carrying a gun. I tend think these two have other reasons for carrying a gun.
Perceived status and a feeling of enhanced manhood? Relishing the sensation that the power to kill gives some people? Attention seeking? Kind of like driving fast in a big car does.
Maybe they just want to pistol whip their girlfriends?

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This will be an interesting show.

Will Jones be charged with MGL chapter 269 section 10(a) or c. 269 s.10(h)? Section 10(a), which is what they usually charge for illegally carrying pistols (firearms) in Boston, has a minimum mandatory sentence of 18 months in the House of Correction. I suppose he could do it in Dukes County like the Al-Saud did, but normally South Bay.

Section 10(h) has no minimum mandatory sentence. It is still a felony which would bar further possession of firearms nationwide.

EDIT: just saw he's also apparently charged under c. 269, s.10(m), illegal possession of a large capacity feeding device (magazine) That's a mandatory 2 1/2 year in state prison sentence!

https://malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartIV/TitleI/Chapter269/Sect...

It could be he's been deputized as a police officer or "peace officer" by some other US jurisdiction like Tempe, Arizona where he played for ASU and thus has a defense under MGL c.140 s.131G. Would not be the first time football players got those honoraries.

The circumstances - trying to bring a firearm onto a plane - are both an argument for harshness and for leniency. Harshness because who knows what could happen or what his intent was. Leniency because it is so stupid it could be a mistake.

I've only seen it broken down from 10(a) to 10(h) where the case for "possession" was weak, or total ignorant possession in car by someone with no criminal record driving through from a place like Tennessee, or someone who is "cooperating" with the Commonwealth i.e. ratting guys out.

Other than that, the argument for leniency is a pure social, economic status one. He's got no reason to be robbing convenience stores or hijacking planes for that matter.

But given Aaron Hernandez, it's a bad jurisdiction for that.

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He was arrested in Seattle for the same thing ten years ago.

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Ah, a pistol packin' Patriot.

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I'll honestly never understand these sports stars who makes millions and somehow can't seem to keep themselves away from playing with guns and general stupidity around this sort of thing. On top of all the guys like Hernandez who had a good thing and decided it would be better to squander it.

I think about Michael Jordan and how he was so successful but also made sure to stay out of trouble and carve out a real estate and product placement empire. Gronk who isn't winning any Nobel prizes but knew how to enjoy life while also setting himself up for financial security forever.

I realize being rich and or famous doesn't fix all of life's problems but jeez , it should at least help convince you to stay out of trouble. It's like Lindsey Lohan and all that drunk driving she did, you can't afford a driver?

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Running into a ton of money all of a sudden, like moving to a new place, doesn't make one person's demons go away; in many case it just enable them.

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Money and fame protect people from consequences... right up until it doesn't, but that line is hard to foresee in your bubble

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Every team needs two felons to keep the choir boys in line. No wonder NFL stands for the National Felons League.

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Although he was caught trying to get on a plane with two loaded guns, that's not really what's a big legal issue here. If this were some other state, all he might be facing are some TSA fines.

What is critical here is that he's in Massachusetts, a state where you're required to have a license for guns and you're not allowed to wander around with a gun magazine and now he's facing potentially serious prison time if he's convicted.

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I absolutely believe Hayden would wish to lower the charge to avoid the mandatory minimum sentence, but it is the large capacity feeding device causing the problem for him. One could try to argue that he needs to protect himself as a wealthy high profile individual and that is was just a failure to go through proper channels to get a license. However, the feeding device is never legal in Massachusetts and it alone carries its own mandatory minimum. That will be hard for Hayden to let fly under the radar. There's only one reason to have one.
Due to it I think he will need to serve time. If Hayden lets Kraft and the NFL know he plans to charge him as it currently stands without reducing, Kraft should release him asap.
The real question is why does this franchise keep picking up players who have the types of issues he had displayed while in and out of college before the NFL. Aaron Hernandez had similar issues. It is one thing to draft a player with an injury history. It is another to draft players with an established rap sheet. There must be a reason. Maybe that is the true "Patriot Way".
I hope Jonathan has better character than his father. Josh is good people like his mother.

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