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Alternatives to French toast

From the shopping lists of some Boston-area bloggers:

Jay Fitzgerald, who went for the sherbet, reports on the tough ethical dilemma he faced in the freezer aisle:

... There were two Edy's Swiss Orange Sherbets left. I was tempted to buy both. But I knew I had another half-full one at home. So I only purchased one. I'm not sure others would have done the same.

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I will cop to telling my husband to feel free to pick up more milk on the way home. But that is for the making of delicious hot cocoa - not french toast. I think I have a bad recipe, my toast always sticks to the griddle.

Meanwhile, I'm making a big pot of chili for the storm. And I'm prepared to bake bribes for my neighbor with the snow blower. He's got a weakness for brownies.

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I'd love to get a recipe for chili sometime!!

American Chop Suey is also great.

Oh, and may I offer a hint for real French Toast to at least minimize it sticking to the pan?:

Using French Bread, a wok, if you have one, and canola oil,

after dippling the individual French Bread slices into the milk-and-eggs mixture until relatively soft and allowing the canola oil in the wok to become hot enough so that it sizzles when one immerses the French Toast slice(s) in it, Fry the slices in the oil until they're crisp and brown on the outside and somewhat soft on the inside. Won't stick to the wok. Drain any excessive grease off onto a plate of paper towels. Serve immediately. Delicious. This is the way my mother used to make real French Toast for breakfast when my sibling(s) and I were growing up. Yummy.

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Hey, do you happen to have any recipes for ice? Or toast?

http://1smootshort.blogspot.com

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Kinda snarky dont ya think? I always make french toast the other way, sans oil, and the toast sticks to the pan. Im not a fan of his methods, as I dont like frying in oil (not for health reasons, just dont like it) but Ive never seen it done like this before.

BTW for your information there are recipes for how to get the best ice you can get, assuming you want nice clear ice. You should boil the water first before pouring the ice. You get nice clear ice cubes instead of cloudy ones. Thats a recipe I do know! Thanks bartending school! Of course you probaly already knew this, but some people didnt so they learned something eeka.

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Eh, I was just messing around. That was actually in response to wanting a recipe for chili. Uh, you dump beans and tomatoes and chilis and stuff in a pot. I'm more making fun of my ghetto-fabulous cooking techniques than anything else.

Ooh, I'm going to have to try that next time I use my ice luge mold. Thanks! For the dorks out there, what process would that be? Melting ice immediately into a gas is sublimation, right? Wha would freezing boiling water be?

http://1smootshort.blogspot.com

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LOL

Im not dorky enough to know the answer to that, but I do know that it takes out the impurities. If your a real stickler and really want that luge looking its shiny best you should boil, then let sit and cool, then boil AGAIN. I do that for my ice shot glasses and it works out great. If you dont boil it ahead of time your ice shot glasses leak easily, and the luge actually developes air pockets.

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You should boil the water first before pouring the ice. You get nice clear ice cubes instead of cloudy ones.

The 5% of the world's population that lives in the U.S. has more environmental impact than the 51% that live in the other five largest countries.

The average American consumes six times more energy than the world average.

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Let me help you off that high horse that your riding on.

If it makes you feel any better I dont drink coffee or tea on any regular basis (only social) so thats 365 days of not having a hot beverage every morning, I have water instead. Not because of the impact, because I like plain water. Most of the time I dont even use ice for the water. I just hope your not a coffee a day person otherwise my occasional hot ice cubes would pale in comparison.

I use the boiling ice (btw make sure it cools down before you freeze it, otherwise you still get bubbles) for special occasions where the ice will be more of a focal point. I also use it when I make ice shot glasses. I dont go all out on parties, rather I believe in doing what you can to make everything nice. So judge if you want , but unless you live in a bamboo hut with a LEED certified tached roof I think your being hypocritical.

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The most incredible ice I ever had was from an iceberg while I was on vacation in Newfoundland. We stayed in a B&B in La Cie, the owner was wonderful, and gave us some local fare - moose stew and ice. I know, I know, how cool can ice be? I agree. But, there was something about this ice. If I remember right (hey, this was 6? years ago), there were no air bubbles in it at all, very solid and smooth. When you put a regular ice cube in your mouth, you can feel a bit of roughness to it from the air. This ice didn't have that.

Sorry for the OT, you just brought back a cool memory....

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Independentminded got to me. I walked to Whole foods, bought beans, pork, lamb and beef and some good spiced chocolate and made a great pot of chili.

Thank you, thank you-- brilliant idea for a day like today.

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I needed to go to the local store to buy some diet coke and pasta (no, we're not combining them), and with all of the people at the store, you get a sense of, "well, maybe I should buy some milk and bread, just in case." It's mob mentality at its finest. Took 5 minutes to shop, 20 minutes to check out.

Bring it on!

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and this:

It's mob mentality at its finest. Took 5 minutes to shop, 20 minutes to check out.

Bring it on!

is good?!? Sorry..no buying

oops--I know you're being snarky here.

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We'll smoke 'em out of the express lane. 10 ITEMS ONLY!

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Speak for yourself.

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... There were two Edy's Swiss Orange Sherbets left. I was tempted to buy both. But I knew I had another half-full one at home. So I only purchased one. I'm not sure others would have done the same.

Its soo good, I think I would have bought both!

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you'll go to heaven and they'll burn in hell. Ice Cream hording is a huge problem and our great national embarrassment. Just say no.

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I read somewhere that New England eats more ice cream per capita then any other region... I dont see how that makes sense but I do have to admit that even during a snow storm from hell I dont mind a scoop of Moose Tracks ice cream!

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Ice-cream all year around for life-long residents of New England!! Yay!!

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;=)

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Cook's Illustrated has an excellent one. Although it's publication date isn't until January 1st, 2009, so I'm not sure we're supposed to read it yet.

I think we have something here with the French Toast Alert system!

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Many years ago, a chef friend taught me something the same but different. The cook's version is to remove the crust from a big loaf of Italian bread and slice the white stuff in two-inch thick chunks. Soak them for hours or even a day in a pint or more of milk with two beaten eggs, a few tablespoon of confectioner's sugar, a dash of vanilla and a couple of good shakes of cinnamon. Turn the marinating slices a few times to get them good and soggy. Then bake on a buttered cookie sheet (it may take two sheets) or saute covered at medium low. Turn once as they brown. Serve with warm maple syrup, ideally with sliced strawberries.

Note that this works with saturated bread that you cook in the pan or oven until it's not gummy, rather puffed.

For anyone who has to work by measuring, I could produce that, but the proportions are less important than the concepts. Even my teens go for this toast.

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when it comes to making French toast, because a wok is deeper, and there's less chance of the French toast slices sticking to the bottom.

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Medium temperature is key. Too many try to rush FT. Fast=Burn=Bad.

If you have the right kind of range, plus a great griddle, that's fine. Baking will do as well though.

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After softening up the 1-inch slices of (preferably French Bread) by dipping it in the milk & eggs mixture, the individual slices get dipped in the hot oil just long enough to brown the slices sufficiently on the outsides, (turning them over, of course), put on a paper toweled plate for a bit to drain off any excess oil, and then served. it's delicious; golden brown and crisp on the outside and soft on the inside. That's how my mom used to make it.

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Don't wok away, Renee ...

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n/m

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n/m

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...that doesn't mean I can't later use it for French Toast. If there's any left, brioche makes wicked pissah French Toast.

Happy storm, everyone.

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Brioche does make amazing french toast. Butter,butter and more butter.
-> Meet The Butterton's video :21 secs

Oh, have you tried making bread pudding with croissant and a sweet whiskey syrup?

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