City Council passes third try at redistricting; mayor says he'll approve this plan

Gintautus Dumcius at the Dorchester Reporter reports the news from City Hall, posts a copy of the final, streetless, map for the revised district boundaries.

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How dare the peasants protest

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How dare the peasants protest our division of the realm!

You think it is easy?

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It is hard work coming up with a redistricting plan that insures Menino and his other "elected" (it's easy if you're the only candidate) cronies stay in office indefinitely.

District 2 changes significant?

So, the new District 2 is made up of approximately 37,000 South End / Chinatown / Downtown Boston residents and 31,000 South Boston residents.

I see this as a major shift.

Of course, it's not resident totals but who votes in elections that matters, and South Boston's residents tend to vote in higher percentages, or at least that's the common belief.

Label the map. NAMES of Council Districts' BORDERING STREETS.

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Label the map with the NAMES of Council Districts' BORDERING STREETS. Post online a list of how each of all PRECINCTS are defined. Open the Redistricting process to the people by having the detailed information needed to understand the process. Put online a mechanism for overlaying proposals and current Boston City Council Districts. Another example of how Boston City Council members obscure a public process by not having available online all the details that would make the process more understandable to more people. And the journalists ingratiated to City Council members limiting the making available of all the important details.

Is anyone but you asking for

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Is anyone but you asking for this information, Don? Anyone? Anyone at all?

Stenographic record of the last 4 City Council public meetings

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Stenographic record of the last 4 public meetings of Boston City Council.
On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 4:14 PM, Kathleen.Sullivan at cityofboston.gov wrote:
>…I have not yet received the Sept. 19 or Oct. 17 records due to computer problems…
>4 attachments
> cc10112012.SGSTN.SGSTN
> cc08222012.SGSTN.SGSTN
> cc09122012.SGSTN.SGSTN
> cc10032012.SGSTN.SGSTN
>Kate Sullivan
>Budget Director and Interim Staff Director
>Boston City Council
>Boston City Hall
>Boston, MA 02201
>Phone: 617 635-4644

Stenographic records include the words of Boston City Council members. The stenographic record is more complete. Minutes are a more abridged document.

Next time you attend a public meeting of Boston City Council ask City Stenographer E. Fritch before or after the meeting for a tour of the stenographic machine computer technology and software. Compare Plover software http://plover.stenoknight.com/ (pronounced like the bird http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/plover ) Would the City save more with Plover?

Nice to see that despite a

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Nice to see that despite a billion dollar budget the city can't afford a sub $100 flip camera to record meetings for hosting on a FREE city YouTube channel.

Deaf folks can read the stenographic record. Plover.

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a) It's a bit easier reading through the bulk of the wordy public meeting. Video and audio take more time to scan. b) City Stenographer E. Fritch creates a document including what cameras and microphones don't capture. c) Don't forget folks with hearing loss.

Read the actual words of a favorite Boston City Council member and reply quoting the words with your feedback, comment, suggestions, questions

Stenographic record vs. Minutes
d) Stenographic records include the words of Boston City Council members. The stenographic record is more complete. e) Minutes are a more abridged document.

f) Take I.F. Stone as an example.

g) Interview. WCVB Channel 5 Chronicle.
How about an interview with longtime City Stenographer E. Fritch and a tour of the stenographic machine technology and software?

h) Compare Plover http://plover.stenoknight.com/ software.