Repairs to pedestrian overpass at Canton train station stopped because Keolis didn't get a building permit

The town of Canton reports.

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    Well, golly gee whiz, Canton

    Of course Keolis didn't bother getting a permit. Did you hear they're losing the contract? That this was even getting done in the first place was a Christmas miracle. What incentive do they have to deal with your bureaucratic nonsense?

    Looks like government strikes again. I don't oppose the idea of a government entity ensuring disabled access, etc, but it looks ridiculous when your official statement talks about putting pressure on Keolis and the MBTA to get this done when you're the ones who made them stop the work in the first place.

    In all fairness the State

    By on

    In all fairness the State building inspector issues the stop order, not the town. I'm sure the town would have been happy to turn a blind eye just to get the work done. The official statement is from the town just to let the residents know what is going on.

    They're still private

    Just because they won a government contract doesn't give them the right to ignore the law. And they didn't lose a contract renewal, it just won't be granted automatically.

    The biggest problem with the T is the lack of competent oversight so after spending millions it falls to shit within years. The fact the state & Canton stepped up to identify construction problems and demand they are fixed is a good thing. Subcontractors will always take the easy way out unless someone demands they Get It Right.

    The rule of law is there for a reason

    By on

    Building permits -- and the review process therein -- exists for a reason. Many, in fact. Public safety, utility reliability, transportation coordination, infrastructure security, yadda yadda.

    Oh, and hey, pulling a permit puts your project on inspectional services' radar. This way they come out and keep an eye on the project, helping to ensure that

    Trip hazards exist on the site on both stairways and accessible ramps; openings on walkways exceed four inches. Ponding is occurring on the accessible ramps, and trip hazards exist where the walkways have not been maintained.

    isn't a thing.

    You may wanna think before being so quick to try to make a point

    By on

    In your zeal to put down the statutory authority of the Town you named wrong place. Anyhow, Canton's Building Department is in charge of issuing permits and overseeing that all work done within its jurisdiction are to code (such as the cited Architectural Access Board violations, non-compliance with the state building codes, cited tripping hazards, etc). What would your response be had this been completed and unusable because it was non-compliant? The regulatory structure is there for a reason. Just look at what happens sometimes in places where it does not exist, or fails due to lack of action.

    I'm not arguing against due diligence

    I'm just mocking the town of Canton (yeah, I fixed it, it's 9:30 in the morning, sue me) for trying to have its cake and eat it too with the whole "we're going to put pressure on them to get this done quickly" rhetoric. Fast, safe, cheap. Pick two.

    Pick one

    Given they've waited years the "Fast" part isn't applicable and since they aren't directly paying for it the "cheap" option isn't there either.

    They want their station built to meet code. Is that too much to ask?

    Speaking of mocking...

    By on

    I'm just mocking the town of Canton for trying to have its cake and eat it too with the whole "we're going to put pressure on them to get this done quickly" rhetoric

    And yet, TFA states that

    a state building inspector has explained the work on the pedestrian overpass was stopped

    .

    Canton didn't fail to apply for the permit, and Canton didn't stop the work. Seems to me like you're mocking the victim here.

    A state building inspector

    By on

    A state building inspector has explained the work on the pedestrian overpass was stopped because Keolis, the Commuter Rail Operator, did not obtain the required building permits from the state to repair the structure. The state inspector reviewed several code issues on the pedestrian overpass with Canton Building Commissioner Ed Walsh. Some issues are a violation of the Massachusetts State Building Code and others are violations of the Architectural Access Board. Trip hazards exist on the site on both stairways and accessible ramps; openings on walkways exceed four inches. Ponding is occurring on the accessible ramps, and trip hazards exist where the walkways have not been maintained.

    Sounds to me that the issues here are far more serious than just a simple failure to pull permits.

    This is stupid

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    What incentive do they have to deal with your bureaucratic nonsense?

    How about "being in business and operating as a construction professional"? But that's right, blame the gummint for a stupid mistake that not even a rookie would make.

    I'm reminded of when John Glenn died

    "What did you think about in space?"

    "That I was supported by an apparatus built by the lowest bidder on a government contract."

    Yeah, I blame the government a little bit. Get the low bid, but there's a minimum that something of quality costs. Does the Commonwealth pay Keolis that minimum?