There are lizards in Boston

Seems a colony of Italian Wall Lizards has established itself in the Fenway Victory Gardens. They normally couldn't survive our winters, but the gardens are full of warmth-supplying mulch.

Massachusetts hasn't had any lizards of the reptilian variety since the five-lined skink went extinct here.

Via Jef Taylor.

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    A well-worded phrase!

    Massachusetts hasn't had any lizards of the reptilian variety since the five-lined skink went extinct here.

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    ADAM GAFFIN

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    ADAM GAFFIN
    Our top story, the population of Italian wall lizards has exploded, and local citizens couldn't be happier! It seems the rapacious reptiles have developed a taste for the common pigeon, also known as the 'feathered rat', or the 'gutter bird'. For the first time, citizens need not fear harassment by flocks of chattering disease-bags.

    MAYOR WALSH
    For decimating our pigeon population, and making Boston a less oppressive place to while away our worthless lives, I present you with this scented candle.

    U-HUB POSTER
    Well, I was wrong. The lizards are a godsend.
    COMMON SENSE
    But isn't that a bit short-sighted? What happens when we're overrun by lizards?
    U-HUB POSTER
    No problem. We simply unleash wave after wave of Chinese needle snakes. They'll wipe out the lizards.
    COMMON SENSE
    But aren't the snakes even worse?
    U-HUB POSTER
    Yes, but we're prepared for that. We've lined up a fabulous type of gorilla that thrives on snake meat.
    COMMON SENSE
    But then we're stuck with gorillas!
    U-HUB POSTER
    No, that's the beautiful part. When wintertime rolls around, the gorillas simply freeze to death.

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    Extinct? Cite? May just be bashful.

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    Wrt the five-lined skink, I could find no firm declarations of it being actually extinct in the Commonwealth, just references to two anectdotal accounts of 19c sightings in Worchester and Bristol (!) counties.

    Given that the species is currently known in eastern NY and southern Vermont, it seems quite possible that it exists in the Berkshires as well, just remote and unremarked as of late.

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    Just bashful

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    They are in the Fells. Near some of the damp areas like the vernal pools and around the Winchester Reservoirs. Ask a mountain biker.

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    THIS^^^^

    They like rocks and scrub and dampness and there's a lot of suitable habitat up there.

    I have been out hiking in the Lawrence Woods and had one scatter across the trail. Surprised me, since I didn't know we had lizards, but they move like you might expect them to. I doubt it was an invasive, since they are about as northerly as lizards get.

    They are listed as extirpated - so I should probably try to get a picture should I see one:
    http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/dfg/dfw/fish-wildlife-plants/reptiles-i...

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    yep

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    And will these lizards be vehemently against other lizard groups that follow them into the US?

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