Four charged with another downtown swarm attack

A group of seven descended on a man and woman walking in Downtown Crossing Friday night and stopped beating the man only when they heard police sirens approaching, the Suffolk County District Attorney's office reports.

The attack came just two days after a group of 20 went on a robbery and beating spree downtown.

Three men - Ayanle Mohamed, 24, of Charlestown, Liban Dualle, 21, of Roxbury, and Nur Herson, 23, of Roxbury, were arraigned today on charges of assault and battery and disorderly conduct. Mohamed was also arraigned on charges of Class B and D drugs. A 17-year-old from Dorchester was arraigned in juvenile court yesterday, the DA's office reports. Three other people remain at large.

According to the DA's office, drug cops were at Tremont and Bromfield streets when they sawy a man and woman approached by six males and one female:

One of the males, later identified as Dualle, approached the male victim, and police saw the man wave Dualle away. Dualle responded by punching the victim in the face, prosecutors said. The woman attempted to help the victim but was pushed away by a member of the group, and every member of the group took part in an assault on the man in the middle of Bromfield Street during which the female was seen kicking the victim. The assault ended and the group dispersed only as they heard sirens in the area as police rushed to respond.

Police were able to apprehend Mohamed and Hersi as the group fled.

Dualle and a 17-year-old female were spotted by police outside the State Street T station, where police heard the juvenile tell Dualle, “You got him good,” prosecutors said. As police attempted to take the two into custody, Dualle began flailing his arms, screaming obscenities, and reached his hands to his waist while refusing commands by police to keep his hands visible, prosecutors said. Fearing for officer safety, police brought Dualle to the ground in order to place him in handcuffs.

During booking, officers discovered a bag of cocaine in Mohamed’s change pocket and marijuana in his sock, prosecutors said.

Unfortunately for police, the victims fled the area as well.

According to the DA's office, Dualle won't be getting out of jail soon even if he makes his $15,000 bail - Boston Municipal Court Judge Michael Coyne revoked his bail on four open cases out of the same court dating to 2012 of trespassing, distibuting marijuana. Mohamed's bail was set at $10,00 and Hersi's at $30,000. The minor female was given bail of $25,000.

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Comments

well ... so much for my

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well ... so much for my comment on the thread from two days ago about this not happening that often. does seem like the police were all over them though.

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I bet the real estate agents

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I bet the real estate agents who will be responsible for selling the luxury condos at the soon to be built Millenuim Tower must be shitting their pants now. I know there are some people here who will respond by saying these were isolated incidents, but remember it,s all about perceptions.

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How many times does something

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How many times does something have to happen before its not an "isolated incident"? If it happens 100 times, are they just 100 isolated incidents?

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Well, yes, it could be

There were way more than 100 muggings in Boston last year, for instance. I don't think muggers have unions and supervisors, post helpful mugging tips on reddit.com/r/walletsnatchin , etc.

I really don't get this idea that there's a conspiracy among teenagers to randomly assault people, other than the general contagion of illogic that surrounds racism. This should be viewed as "teenagers are jerks and Roxbury is tough."

But I do understand why all these anonymous commenters would never link these four people to the four Southie residents who beat up that guy on the Red Line.

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So then everything is an

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So then everything is an "isolated incident"? Was WW2 just a series of isolated incidents perpetrated by individual Germans, Japanese, British, etc?

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Yeah, there's really no

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Yeah, there's really no reason why white people would be getting assaulted randomly aside from racism. I'm glad you agree!

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FYI

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If you find yourself surrounded by juveniles looking to issue a group beatdown, immediately attack any females in the group first. Often the males are so shocked by the turn of events that they will move away and assist the female.

Awful, but it's true.

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..or pull out a knife. Most

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..or pull out a knife. Most kids who need to be in groups to beat someone up aren't too brave in the face of danger.

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Bad idea

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Enjoy having bricks, stones, and pieces of concrete thrown at your head, mister "stay back, I've got a small weapon with an extremely limited reach".

Good on you for having some means to defend yourself; now keep it hidden as best you can, don't lead with it, and use it quickly and brutally when injury is imminent.

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a gun or knife can be taken

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a gun or knife can be taken from you but trust me NO ONE is coming near you if you have pepper spray or mace. i suggest everyone get a permit if they can

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"Awful, but true."

"Awful, but true."

Well, shoot, I'm convinced. You must have really reliable data backing this up if you concede how awful your point is.

Next time I'm completely outnumbered and unarmed by an intimidating group of youths, I'll be sure to escalate the situation uncontrollably by attacking a woman.

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Seriously

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Or, they're so outraged you attacked one of their women, the kill you instead of just beating the shit out of you.

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Yeahhhh a bad idea, but I get the premise

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Well, I have been taught that the best reaction when confronted with imminent attack by a larger group is to quickly unleash the most vicious and unexpected action possible, which will cause confusion and hesitation in your attackers and possibly give you an opportunity to escape or at least to inflict further damage. I suppose smashing a girl's face open would be keeping in spirit with this theory, but I too can't help but see this backfiring and would suggest something that would get more of a "wow, this guy is crazy!" reaction, rather than "wow, this guy is an incredible asshole!".

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Seriously, taught by whom? By

Seriously, taught by whom? By somebody who has experience in this situation? Or by somebody who took some classes and read a book by Chuck Norris? Unleashing the most vicious assault possible can backfire in literally every possible situation. You are clinging to a possibility that's really quite faint.

Attacking an attacker while unarmed maybe makes sense if it's one-on-one, but still risky. Otherwise, it's totally bonkers.

Drug Deal

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Downtown crossing is junkie central... This was not a random attack.. Not that it makes it right.

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Exactly

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I'd hate to be a cop. You risk your life every day doing your job, only to have your hard work all for naught when the judges let these savages out again and again and again...

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Judges are

not to blame for Suffolk County juries that let maggots like these go. I've witnessed firsthand numerous instances of assaults and illegal behavior that when addressed by police the witnesses and community members at or near the scene proceed to blame the police for the actions of the criminals. These same witnesses did nothing to intervene or stop the criminal activity or assault. Nullifying justice because of perceived injustice in the past does nothing but promote this cycle of violence and lack of responsibility. How do you rationalize a comment like that made at a recent arrest scene where a perpetrator of an assault resists arrest requiring physical response by police who are then accused of "disrespecting" the criminal by "community members"?

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Juries don't handle

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Juries don't handle sentencing. Half of these animals have long records, meaning they were convicted and then given a slap on the wrist and allowed to terrorize the general public again.

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Damned if they Do and damned if they don't mentality.

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It is true that the My Baby is innocent and he was just a normal kid in the neighborhood attitude exists criminal murder trials are rough most just plead negotiate and walk on lesser charges

Shame on the laws

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that are based on the idiotic principle of "but they're only juveniles, so we presume they don't know better."

Time to base prosecution and sentencing (if the suspect if found guilty) on the severity of the crimes they are charged with, and not totally arbitrary and irrellevant measures like a suspect's age. If the defense wants to play the sham game of arguing their suspect's immaturity, let them do it during the trial.

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Does your calendar say 1985?

In 1985 or even 1990 I might believe that. I think your perceptions are dated. Yes, there is some drug activity, but downtown crossing just a nexus of public transit and bad landlords ... plus a big hole.

Working in the area, I would wager that the drug activity is a lot more prevalent around South Station.

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It used to be true that DTX

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It used to be true that DTX was "cleaned up" but unfortunately I've personally seen a serious slide-back towards high levels of drug activity and all the terrible shit that comes with it. I think it's only started to be noticeably much worse a year or two ago.

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Downtown is awful now. Try

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Downtown is awful now. Try going down early, say 10am on Sunday. Bums and drug addicts everywhere. Loss prevention in Macy's must have their hands full as well.

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Hmmm.

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I'd actually say, with great sadness, that DTX was a lot safer and healthier in 1985 that it is now. The number of visibly drug-addicted/high/desperate-looking people is much higher now than it was then, at least as a proportion of the people walking around. The biggest difference of course is the number and types of businesses and the sense of decline and even desolation the place has now, especially in the off hours. No Filene's Basement, no Strawberries, no B & N; Winter St. is a shadow of it's former self. And yes, again--a lot of drug-related goings on.

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No

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No it wasn't. I lived in a loft at 511. The combat zone was still there. More interesting, yes. Safer and healthier? Most definitely not.

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I don't know what 511 is.

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And yes--I remember when the Combat Zone end of things was more, er...colorful than it is now. But DTX proper was a much livelier place. There were always crazy people and addicts and homeless people but they were generally outnumbered by regular folks which does not feel like the case now.

The transformation of the combat zone and the whole area around what is now Emerson is a whole different story--that corner of the Common was always a hotspot until very recently. But the actual stretch of Washington between Brattle Street and Old South Church, say, feel very different to me.

I did!

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You know--I knew even as I typed that that it was wrong.

It was pretty bad in the 80s

The problem was that everywhere was pretty bad in the 80s.

I agree that it has gotten worse as bad landlords have shuttered businesses because they hiked rents and people moved out, and because of the Giant Freaking Hole problem. But I do walk around a lot (mostly in day time, but sometimes in the evening if I have a late work dinner), and I would still peg the area of the Leather District over by the Bus Station to have more drug use activity, if not outright dealing, than DTX. I certainly see a lot more police presence in the downtown crossing area.

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Not as bad in the 80s as now

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DTX was not as bad in the 80s as it is now. It was still a thriving shopping destination . The 80s were only the beginning of the decline, as it was for so many urban "downtown" areas. I still maintain that the changover from plain old "Washington Street" to the traffic-less "Downtown Crossing" was the death knell of that area. Blocking off traffic and encouraging "lingering" in the streets of that area, as if it were full of Paris cafes and beautiful people, could never have possibly worked there. And it didn't.

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Exactly. They're going for a

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Exactly. They're going for a pedestrian mall sort of thing except there's nothing there so junkies hang out there because they know cops are too lazy to get out of their cars and they're safe there.

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True!

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We have way more heroin users and pill a users in the city now. They are so miserable and desperate. We had more creeps and perverts in the 80s because of the combat zone. The shelter pick up at the common attracts lots of addicts and dealers that prey on them.

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The 80s had far more drugs

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The 80s had far more drugs than now. It isn't even close to the days when cocaine was everywhere. did you ever walk by Hank's?Barracuda Lounge or Penn Pub/Sidecar back in 1985?

Crime is miniscule compared to the 80s. Folks get tossed in jail faster than ever. BPD is very professional. Racial, meaning black-on-white crime is diminished. The vast amount of prescription drugs in the area come from Tufts and B.U. Boston has always been a center of prescription drug dealing because of all of the medical students.

The 70s had more crime than the 80s.

DTX is vacant because brick and mortar retail is a dying thing.

High Rent Desolation Versus Safety In Numbers

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Good work by the police, for apprehending the culprits so quickly!

I've been taking advantage of the extended late night Ⓣ service these past three Friday nights. So far, the extended service has been really nice! The passengers and even the Ⓣ employees have been friendly, and make the whole evening a very pleasant experience. If it ran just a little bit longer, I'd be able to use it on Saturday nights too, but this is a good start.

Last Friday around midnight, I needed to change from the Blue Line to the Orange Line. Rather than walk through the long urethral corridor that excretes onto the Forest Hills platform, I went outside through the Old State House fare lobby, ran down Washington Street, and then back in at the Old South Meeting House entrance. I don't know whether this was before or after the reported "swarm attack" occurred there.

Instead of a vibrant downtown bustling with nightlife, the whole area was depressingly desolate. Not much, if anything seemed to be open and there were very few people on the streets. The city ought to do more to encourage downtown businesses to stay open later, with extra credit for being open 24 hours.

There's safety in numbers, so attracting more (non-criminal) people to the neighborhood would make a big difference. The extended Ⓣ service could be a catalyst, but the business community needs to participate more as well.

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That's what I notice even in daytime.

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Downtown crossing has mainly become a place that rolls up sidewalks at sundown.

It may be a great place to see the contrast between new glitz Boston where all the money went and shabby old Boston where they don't bother to fix anything more than needed and there isn't much of a reason to be there if you aren't working.

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Bad landlords holding out for

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Bad landlords holding out for more and more money to lease their empty storefronts. If a storefront is empty, there is no private security to broom these punks away, making the cops do all the work.

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Who owns the old Barnes &

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Who owns the old Barnes & Noble on Washington and how can they afford to keep it vacant for what, seven years now?

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Oops, I'm about the die of

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Oops, I'm about the die of embarrassment. I just realized it's the former F.Y.E./Strawberries building I was thinking about.
And if you want a link just google Fox Residences Downtown Boston.

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I don't think this is drug

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I don't think this is drug related but if you really think DTX has no drug activity you are dreaming. That area is very sketchy.

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Lots of drugs

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Haymarket area and downtown crossing are Big hangouts for OxyContin users and methadone patients probably the only place worse in Boston is between the Boston medical center McDonald's and Andrew square. Quincy center is pretty awful these days as well

McGovernites must remember that

liberal icon McGovern was a Warrior flying and surviving 35 WWII combat missions when most crews were lost within 10 missions. Conservative icon Ronald Reagan did serve in the pre WWII peacetime army and upon the outbreak of hostilities led men in a unit assigned to the motion picture industry. Who was the War Hero? Perception.

You don't need to explain or defend your choice of words in describing punks.

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This crap won't stop

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Until someone pulls out a gun and goes Bernie Goetz on those thugs. They're not afraid of police, and they certainly aren't afraid of "dat bitch-ass cracka in a funny robe" and laughably shorts stays in a minimum security state prison - it's a rite of passage for them, not punishment. Animals only understand force and fear.

There, now all the bleeding-heart W suburb morons can scream BINGO.

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We all remember how bad crime

We all remember how bad crime was in New York until it suddenly stopped thanks to the racist reckless violence of Bernie Goetz. After Bernie Goetz shot four unarmed black teenagers for beginning an attempt to rob him, which clearly required lethal force, New Yorkers never again committed unprovoked violence against strangers.

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No, crime in NYC was reduced

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No, crime in NYC was reduced by stop and frisk policing. Not that you're a fan of that either.

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Fear

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One is less likely to demand an iphone from a random stranger when there's a real possibility of the said stranger pulling out a Ruger LCP instead of an iPhone, and the trip to CeX and Foot Locker turning into a trip to the local morgue.

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juvenile?

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Dualle and a 17-year-old female were spotted by police outside the State Street T station, where police heard the juvenile tell Dualle, “You got him good,"

Aren't 17 year olds charged as adults? More like protecting her name while they get her to tell on the rest of the scum.

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No more or less than you

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If the metric for whether someone should disappear or die immediately were whether they were a societal blip or not, then any one of us could disappear with the same effect.

There's nothing you do to move society's needle that someone else couldn't be doing in your place. You're not as productive as you think you are and someone else could take your same opportunities. In baseball, there's a term, VORP, which calculates the Value Over Replacement Player. For nearly everyone from bum to President, our societal VORP is pretty close to zero.

Someone somewhere could do your job as good as you, if not better. It's the fact that most of our VORPs are positive and cumulative that improves society. You could say their VORPs are negative, but in the grand scheme they're meaninglessly so. QED, we wouldn't miss them, but then again we wouldn't miss you either. So, we'll call it a draw and only punish them for their crime, not their worth...same as you.

What A Great Post, Kaz!

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Your philosophy fits into the "Life's Never Perfect" one of mine. There will always be people and things in life that we don't like and that we cannot change. Of course, it's important to do our best to try, but acceptance of reality brings inner peace and the ultimate joy of simply appreciating the gift of our own existence.

It's very easy to get caught in circumstance.
It's even easier to break out in a dance.

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