MS-13 member gets nearly 8 years in prison for racketeering, trying to kill a rival gang leader

Pineda

Angel "Bravo" Pineda, 21, of Revere, was sentenced to 93 months in federal prison today after admitting involvement in a criminal conspiracy and for his role in a failed bid to kill a leader of a rival gang, the US Attorney's office reports.

Pineda, a Honduran national, will be deported after serving his sentence, the US Attorney's office reports.

Pineda is the latest of several dozen local MS-13 members to plead guilty and be sentenced following a local/federal sweep last year.

Authorities blame the gang members for several murders, including of teenagers in East Boston, that were aimed both at fighting the rival 18th Street gang and at serving as an initiation rite. The killings may have continued after the bust.

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Bravo!

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Only plotting the killings that Americans refuse to plot. If only he made a break for it. It's a short sprint from the Moakley courthouse to the sanctuary of Marty's City Hall or the Red Line to Davis, where Somerville's Mayor Curtatone could have protected him. God bless the victims of MS-13 and all illegals.

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More drivel

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Your not even trying anymore, its disappointing.

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Deporting "illegals" just

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Deporting "illegals" just means more young kids growing up with one parent and actually more prone to getting successfully recruited by gangs. I fear for 15-20 years from now seeing the effects of so many young Americans have their families ripped apart.

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I think the children will be

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I think the children will be better off without MS-13 gang members for parents. Oh and other people's children will be better off too.

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Do some research on MS13

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The gang was started in the US. In California prisons, to be exact. Many, many members are US Citizens. Kids get drawn in to the gang, whether they want to or not, for a variety of reasons. No stable home life, lack of strong parental figure in their life, etc. Sometimes kids feel they have no choice to but to join and survive. Recruiting can start at a very young age. Grade school kids are groomed by gang members and think it's a life they want to be a part of. People in the US, some US citizens, some immigrants, have family members in their home country threatened.

NO ONE ever suggests providing sanctuary to MS 13 or 18th Street gang members.

And, if the cops arrest someone suspected of being with these gangs, they do contact the Feds. It's a joint effort to prosecute and imprison them. The problem is after they are deported back to their country of origin, some find their way back to the US.

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Yes maybe started in the US

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Yes maybe started in the US but not by US citizens. The issues from the homelands spilled over into the US and MS-13 was created.

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wow

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They're only deporting members of MS-13? Good to know.

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collaboration

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I'm uncertain what you're talking about. To suggest that communities would harbor a wanted criminal, when the local authorities have collaborated with feds in arresting M-13 gang members makes no sense. But I think you must know that especially since a link to a report of one of last year's sweeps is contained within this article.

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Honest and naive question

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How are organized international gangs like MS-13 able to keep a presence in Boston?

Can't all Boston-based members be implicated in organized criminal activity, and rounded up all at once, with help of the feds?

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The Government Tried That in the 1770's Around Here

Didn't turn out that well for the government of the time. The local lawbreakers won if I remember correctly. Just remember, there were roughly 11,000 military personnel in the Boston area last time things got really out of hand. That was about 1 soldier for about every 25 people in Massachusetts. That would be like having 240,000 cops today (the population of Somerville, Newton, and Cambridge combined) just kind of chilling and in need of things to do.

Unless you are one of those I wasn't using my civil liberties anyway kind of people, then yes, let the government willy nilly indict people, like Russia or China or some Third World hellhole.

Instead, how about letting the justice system do its work, legally? Things will be fine.

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I forgot we have civil liberties

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It seems that civil liberties of everyone are being violated with impunity, except when I'd actually be willing to grant a freebie (against violent organized criminal groups and foreign paramilitaries on our soil).

And then you take down all that creepy surveillance of ordinary people. We got a deal?

I'm only half-serious. Boston has a history of corruption, and our current federal executive branch flaunts much worse corruption, so I'm sure we'd find a way to abuse even a freebie that seemed justifiable at the time.

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For some reason the Feds like

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For some reason the Feds like using me against the Mafia but not other organized gangs.

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8 years for this many and

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8 years for this many and serious crimes? What a joke. No wonder these clowns aren't afraid of the authorities.

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And he'll probably get out

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And he'll probably get out early so that we can make more room for drug offenders.

Almost won that war on drugs, can't stop now!

/s

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