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Zakim lit in blue to honor fallen police officer

Zakim Bridge honors fallen police officer

617 Images shows us the Zakim tonight, lit in blue to honor Yarmouth police officer Sean Gannon, 32, shot to death while serving a warrant last Thursday.

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Voting closed 55

Do programs offered during incarceration, which help qualify inmates for parole, work? We don't know.

The Sun Chronicle:

Massachusetts taxpayers paid the Council of State Governments for a report released in February 2017, which stated on page 9, “Prior to allocating funds for specific programs, DOC or the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security (EOPSS) must evaluate the quality of programs funded by the state and report results to the legislature.”

Yet, in the criminal justice reform bill H.4012 “An Act implementing the joint recommendations of the Massachusetts criminal justice review” that was passed by the legislature and signed into law by the governor, this was not included. Why? I will tell you why. In my experience as a state representative, this is not a priority. I was told over and over again that we are going to take it up and we have not.

Now this new law will increase inmate participation in programs of unknown value and release these inmates to the street.

How many more police officers are going to get killed by inmates who participated in prison programs of unknown effectiveness?

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Voting closed 40

Still waiting on the judge to resign or any accountability in the judiciary and prosecutors' office for providing a violent habitual offender a revolving door.

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Voting closed 7

They are not employees of prosecutors, and they are not omnipotent.

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Voting closed 0

117 offenses including multiple violent felonies, he just needed ONE more chance to be a good boy and not any sort of prison or structured rehabilitation treatment to not be a danger to himself or others.

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Voting closed 21

of prosecutors by giving lenient sentences, why aren't they required to explain their actions on the public record? That's the flaw here.

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Voting closed 35

A criminal trial is an adversarial proceeding between two sides. Each side makes recommendations for sentencing. The judge decides upon the sentence.

Why do you keep suggesting that failing to follow the prosecution's recommendation is somehow different from failing to follow the defense's recommendation, and somehow needs to be defended?

The judge is not supposed to follow anybody's recommendation; he or she is supposed to follow the law.

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Voting closed 35

The Massachusetts Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that judges in the state have "deliberative privilege," meaning they do not have to disclose what they were thinking when they made their rulings.

https://ballotpedia.org/Massachusetts_judges_have_deliberative_privilege

Next you'll want them to respond to public records requests, or be accountable to the public in some other manner as a branch of government.

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Voting closed 37

Sean was killed on a Thursday. Gov. Baker enacted the criminal justice reform bill the next day. People should not be calling for the repeal of the criminal justice reform bill that had nothing to do with Sean's death. We should learn what factors contributed to his death from the operation to serve the warrant to his parole to the decision to parole him to his original sentence. We should not make assumptions about what factors contributed to his death.

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Voting closed 20

Any change in government policy is going to help some, hurt others. Anyone who expects a program to be flawless with no negatives is a fool.

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Voting closed 38

Yeah, he died. It’s not worth all this pomp and “fallen” rhetoric. Police do the job people don’t want to do, and it’s dangerous, but elevating the job because you respect some mental construct of authority is Insincere and antithetical to individual self-actualization.

Police are guys just like you and me, and they have more responsibility to act in the public interest. If you infantalize yourself to a uniform, you’ll never get what you really need, you’ll just acquiesce to whatever their bosses are pushing over you.

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Voting closed 56

I get it. This is a tragedy for this officers family. I understand he left a wife and they seemed young with their future ahead of them.

But...I feel things do get a bit carried away. I understand the "brotherhood"nature of the job and all, but I do feel the procession to be a bit much. Families suffer similar tragedies daily.

Now when the uniformed officers pack the courthouse when this creep gets his day, that's just intimidation in my opinion. I never liked it and I lose a bit of respect for the department when they do this. I'm really surprised it's allowed.

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Voting closed 42

Being a police officer does not automatically place you in "hero" category. A hero does something that is heroic, i.e. saving someone from a burning building and risking their own life. Getting shot in the line of duty as a police officer is not the same. It is a tragic fact of being in that line of work.

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Voting closed 21

If this cop went into a burning building (which cops sometimes do) would that make him a hero? What is the difference?

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Voting closed 39

It is not the action of going into a burning building that creates a hero. This officer lost his life attending to an arrest warrant. (I am not even sure why a K-9 officer was there but whatever). How does that action make him a "fallen hero"? Because he was killed in the line of duty? So, by that reasoning, every cop that is killed doing his or her job is a hero?

Remember a few years back when the man saved a pregnant woman at a local Betrucci's by stepping between her and her knife wielding assailant? And he lost his life protecting her and her unborn child? That is a hero.

I realize this is "close to home" for you but when everyone is a "hero" for whatever they do it negates what being a true hero is really about.

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Voting closed 40

And that isn't reason to say that either. Most police officers die in the line of duty responding to calls in motor vehicle crashes. I wouldn't call all of those cops "heroes". Serving warrants on dangerous felons can be very dangerous and most cops don't sign up for warrant teams or special units for this very reason. (FYI the K9 is used to specifically find people hiding in places like the guy in Cape Cod was and is meant to prevent cops and citizens from a larger used of force like a firearm)

But answer my other point. If a cop runs into a burning building and saves someone, is he a hero? What if a teacher or firefighter does it? I say they would all be heroes, just like the man who stood up for the pregnant lady in the Bertuccis.

Are you saying that if someone goes into a burning building regardless of their profession and saves someone, they aren't a hero?

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Voting closed 35

are you really having a discussion of the merits of being a police officer and the validations of being a hero on the day of his burial.

Have some respect and also find something better to do with your time than going on a chatroom to debate what constitutes as a hero or not.

the officer died in the line of fire. It is people like him who keep your neighborhoods safe.

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Voting closed 46

It's as good day a day as any for that discussion. What constitutes heroic service.

Here's something I'd like to know: What procedures does an officer of the law follow when serving a warrant to a person on parole who has a long record including violence?

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Voting closed 8

Like going into a burning building, serving a warrant sometimes needs to be done to protect others, and we know that it's often dangerous, and sometimes officers get killed doing it.

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Voting closed 46

is that the pomp and "fallen" rhetoric is part of the compensation package. The implicit contract is, "Take on this job, which might result in you being killed, and, if you are, we'll make sure you are remembered as a hero."

It gives comfort to the family and friends of a person who took on a difficult job and died doing it.

We do something similar, but lower key, with commercial fishermen.

What's the harm in it?

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Voting closed 49

This young man died trying to get a violent criminal off the streets so WE can be safer. He died trying to make the world a safer place for law abiding citizens. That makes him a hero.

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Voting closed 40