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Globe looks to hire temp workers to deliver papers, like right this second

We weren't the only ones who wondered what would happen when all those exhausted Globe reporters went home Sunday after delivering papers. Looks like David Bernstein found their replacement: A "sharing economy" startup that launched last year to hire people to staff parties is now looking for people to assemble and deliver newspapers out of some unspecified media organization's distribution centers in Newton and Pembroke, which just happen to be where the Globe has distribution centers.

They're paying $12 an hour, plus you get $24 a day for car expenses. And you can start, as the ad says, TONIGHT! Even better:

After you deliver the papers you are free to go straight home and you do not need to report back to the distribution center.

Oh, but you will have to report at 2 a.m.

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Comments

Former Distributor is asking for now.

And if I were them, I'd raise the amount every day this disaster continues.

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First he destroyed Boston.com to bring back revenue to BostonGlobe.com

Next he is downsizing and going back to the roots of Washington Street, abandoning the printing presses in Dorchester.

Now he is destroying home delivery of the physical paper.

It almost seems like he just wants a purely subscription based digital format.

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Step 1: Charge 50% of the home-delivery-cost of the Globe for digital subscription to the Globe
Step 2: Through a hilariously wacky set of hijinks, drive all paying print subscribers to digital subscription
Step 3: ???
Step 4: Profit!

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The printing and distribution cost is probably more than half of the subscription cost. Content production is fairly cheap and fixed, given that it's done through salaried staff, pre-paid wire services, and freelancers who don't have benefits.

I don't actually think it'd be unreasonable to end delivery of paper-papers (except maybe the Sunday edition, some people are attached to that), and just produce paper copies for brick and mortar stores. I really doubt they'd lose that many customers.

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After all, at least 155,000 households subscribe to the daily Globe and pay a lot to do so. Sure, we could all save money right now by reading it on the iPad or whatever but it seems that we like it on paper, thank you.

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Obviously, you are very much in the minority. The great majority of us are outraged by being denied our paper papers. I'm 73, and too much screen time, no matter the device, gives me a headache and red eyes. We already waste too much paper printing out stuff I want to read online, but at least my granddaughter can use the backside for artwork. Also, I have to spend a fair amount of time sitting with my feet up, which makes a paper paper the only way to do crosswords, etc. Also, how will we light the fire?

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It almost seems like he just wants a purely subscription based digital format.

Which is almost trivial to work around (clear cookies).

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the Globe today...

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Have sales of other print newspapers risen during the time period of lesser Globe deliveries? Obviously, the Herald would be the largest alternative at most newsstands, but what about Worcester Telegram, Patriot Ledger, etc.? Are Globe readers strictly Globe readers or have some sought alternative hard copy news sources? Anyone have access to any figures?

Suldog
http://jimsuldog.blogspot.com

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It's not like a strike or the newspaper going out of business (at least for the moment). I bought 2 newspapers during the past 8 days of no delivery, and both times I bought the Globe. Despite their circulation disaster, it's the paper I want to read. Otherwise I wouldn't try to pay one of the highest prices in the country for home delivery to read it.

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My normal routine is to buy the Globe every day at a store, and there were two days this week when I was unable to do that because the only local merchant was sold out -- Fri. Jan. 1, and Sun. Jan. 3. Both were days when my usual store was closed, so I went to a convenience store a few blocks further away. The convenience store had a sign saying they weren't taking the Globe's coupons; on Jan. 1, they had also sold all their Heralds and Times and had only a couple of New York Posts left.

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