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Somebody with measles visited the Fenway Tasty Burger and Terminal B at Logan

The Boston Public Health Commission reports anybody who might have visited the Tasty Burger on Boylston Street between 7 and 11 p.m. on July 19 or Terminal B at Logan Airport between 8:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m on July 20 should check themselves for possible measles symptoms - because it's confirmed that somebody with an active case visited those places at those times.

Early symptoms include a high fever, runny nose, cough, and red eyes. A skin rash usually occurs three to five days later and begins as flat, red spots on the face. If experiencing these symptoms, people are advised to contact their health care provider by phone immediately for further instructions. If a person has had measles in the past or has received two doses of the vaccine, they are unlikely to become ill even if exposed. If they are uncertain of their immunity status, BPHC recommends monitoring for symptoms and contacting their health care provider.

More info on measles.

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Comments

If you are in mid-life, be aware that measles immunity doesn't last unless you had an extra booster in your teens or young adulthood (it wasn't known to be an issue until young adults started getting Measles).

If you are over 40 or so and can't remember having that booster, you might consult your doctor about getting one.

And, as always VACCINATE YOUR KIDS! Millions of people on chemo or with compromised immune systems depend on herd immunity to stay safe!

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How about those of us who have had measles? Do we need a booster shot as well?

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.

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on business, was surprised to learn at my recent annual physical that I might want to get vaccinated for Hep A before my next trip abroad, have scheduled it. Shame on me for not knowing better, but I appear to have dodged a bullet in eating the street food in 60 countries without a problem. And another one for Hep B, the transmission vectors for which I'm less at risk, not being a needle-drug user or careless sexual dallier, but I'll get that one, too. The more you know.

I'd say that people who oppose vaccinations for their kids are the dumbest people on the planet, unconscionable for how their ignorance hurts not just their families but the general populace, except that Trump is President, and a solid 30% of Americans still think that's a great idea.

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Don't plan to do anything with the arm you get the Hep A shot in for the rest of the day. It hurts about as much as one and a half tetanus shots. I know that because I got a Hep A shot and a tetanus shot on the same day in different arms.

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I have thrice been exposed by travelling senior faculty who picked it up in China or Haiti or similar places.

They hadn't been vaccinated because it was believed that older adults had "mild" cases - never mind that they can carry it (and what my department head had was not mild!). Both were in their 60s when they picked it up.

Might be worth asking your doctor about it if you travel often and haven't had a booster in a while. I'm glad that I was caught up on it and didn't wind up part of the mini epidemics.

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I'm with you in not expecting to need the Hep B vaccination for my 2007 trip to China. However, when I mentioned the same to my brother (with whom I was travelling), he reminded me that the little child he was adopting was full of bodily fluids we might encounter. I suspect you're not travelling for that reason, but you never know just what you might encounter.

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You don't have to be a "needle-drug user or careless sexual dallier" to get hep B; it lives quite happily outside the human body. A doctor once told me that it can live in a dried smear of blood on a table for a week or more. I had a friend who got a raging case, and everybody he had any contact with was tested including housemates. All came up negative, and the best guess in the end was that it had been food transmission, even though it's not officially supposed to be food-borne. I would not take the chance.

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Admittedly I'm old, but when I was a kid in the 60s kids got measles and then got over them and nobody really thought much of it. In fact it was expected that kids would get them. Is there some new super horrible deadly evil strain of measles now or something?

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For starters.

I guess you didn't have inclusive classrooms and you never saw the damaged kids. I did.

Also consider: measles is pretty much the most intensely infectious disease on the planet.

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itIt's about vulnerable people that can't get vaccinated, like newborn babies, or people going through chemo.

This is how herd immunity actually works
https://imgur.com/a/8M7q8

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