City workers legally free again to badmouth Olympic proposal

Mayor Walsh's office said today he and the US Olympic Committee have agreed to a revised contract "joinder" that no longer prohibits city workers from saying negative things about the Olympics.

In January, Walsh had signed off on a clause that prohibited such Debbie Downer talk - which he said was just boilerplate that every other city had always agreed to and something he never had any intention of enforcing.

Superintendent candidate would decentralize Boston schools

Tommy Chang, who currently oversees 115,000 students in 132 schools in Los Angeles, says moving BPS to the next level would require giving all schools far greater autonomy than most now have.

"All schools deserve levels of autonomy and should be doing innovative things," Chang told members of the School Committee today.

Chang is one of four finalists for superintendent being interviewed this week. The committee votes March 3 on a candidate for Mayor Walsh's consideration.

Councilors propose city alcohol tax to fund substance-abuse programs

City councilors Bill Linehan (South Boston, South End, Chinatown) and Frank Baker (Dorchester) will try for legislative approval to let Boston charge up to a 2% tax on sales of alcohol in local liquor stores and restaurants as a way to curb substance abuse in the city.

The two will ask the council tomorrow to start the ball rolling on their proposal, which they say would not only help alcoholics and addicts but the city as a whole by reducing the amount of crime related to substance abuse.

Councilors: Boston needs beefier snow-removal equipment

All quiet today at the South Boston snow farm. Photo by Conventures.

City Councilors Tim McCarthy (Hyde Park, Roslindale, Mattapan) and Mark Ciommo (Allston/Brighton) say the past month suggests the city needs better equipment for clearing city streets in the winter.

The two say that despite valiant efforts of city DPW workers, all the snow led to "gridlock and dangerous conditions" across the city and that residents continue to struggle just to get up and down their own streets.

Olympics backers claim 100,000 to 125,000 jobs, but admit not all will be paid

WBUR reports on a Boston 2024 community meeting in Roxbury:

"Let me talk about jobs specifically," Fish said. "When you talk about hosting an Olympic and Paralympic Games, there will be over 100,000 to 125,000 jobs, between volunteers and newly created jobs. This can be, we feel confident, benefit the entire community."

But asked how many will be paid and how many will be volunteer, Boston 2024 CEO Richard Davey didn’t have an answer.

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