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Eagle Hill gets resident-only parking; not everybody happy

The East Boston Times-Free Press reports the city has approved a resident permit system for the East Boston neighborhood; reports that among the opponents are the owners of Rino’s Place, who wonder where their customers will park now.

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I dont live in East Boston but I like to eat at Rino's . Parking is a huge problem now, even before the resident stickers go into effect. Sometimes sketchy random guys offer to park your car for a few dollars, and other random guys stand in front of parking spaces to save them presumably for someone who is circling the block. And once the new system goes into effect, the area around Rino's will become prime territory for meter maids and meter men.

The owner is right about visitor parking spaces. Since residents can also park there, whats the point of even having them? (This applies to the whole city).

I hope the elected representatives can find a solution.

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there are 2 kinds of visitor parking signs in residential neighborhoods.
1 is the visitor 2 hour limit, or resident no limit. the other is a straight 2 hour limit without the resident exception.
An institution such as Rino's will have no problem getting 2 hour visitor parking spaces right in front of their business.
Instead of bitching, if they worked with EHCA and BTD they could end up with a better parking situation than they have now.

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Only 2 hours to both wait for a table and enjoy your meal? I'm not so sure you've ever been to Rino's.

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There's a program in the city where you hire somebody to park your customers vehicles. It's called valet parking. Oh wait, that cost money. Sorry.

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they putting the cars?

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The same parking lots and garages all the bike riding hipsters say the City doesn't need more of. Until of course it effects them when they try to go out to eat, drink and puke.

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to East Boston? Particularly that part of East Boston?

And what the hell do "bike riding hipsters" have to do with any of this? For that matter, what the hell does trying to "go out to eat, drink and puke" have to do with the restaurant in question?

And seriously, you need a hug or something.

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DiCenso recently took to social media to plead her case.

“I would like to know who started this, I would like to know when and where were these meetings taking place, I would to know who voted, I would like to know who approved it, I would like to know if every person who lives in the area considered “Eagle Hill” were notified, I would like to know why wasn’t my business as well as others notified?”. she wrote on Facebook. “Yes, I would like to know a lot of things.”

Seriously? Learn how to talk with the residents and you'll know more Mrs. DiCenso. If that's too hard, then keep up with EHCA's Facebook. Here, I'll even provide a link for you:
https://www.facebook.com/eaglehillcivicassociation

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Where on that apparently month and a half old page page does it say anything about the required surveys or hearings for resident parking? The process is supposed to take longer than this page has even been around. Also, based on conversations in the Eastie neighborhood Facebook groups (of which the owners of Rino's and many other local businesses are active members), a lot of residents knew nothing about this, so where did the 51% of signatures per street as required by the city come from?

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it is not set in stone that 51% of signatures of residents per street are required if doing the whole neighborhood. People had been doing this street by street. It would take years to get it done were it done this way. The residents who regularly attend the EHCA meetings have been asking for this for years. With all the new development happening in the area, the parking needs to be for residents first and foremost. There will be plenty of parking for non-residents near businesses, such as Rino's. The woman there opened her mouth without knowing all the details and seeing the map.

Petition Requirements

Typically, a new Program, or an expansion thereof, must be initiated by neighborhood residents in the form of a petition signed by a minimum of 51% of residents who:

•Are 18 years of age or older; and

•Live on the streets proposed to be included in the Program.

In general, it is required that more than one street in a neighborhood is included in a new Program request.

You will be asked to include the following with your petition signatures:

•City of Boston neighborhood;

•Streets proposed to be included in the Resident Parking Program; and

•A description of current parking problem on these streets.

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of even having a "system" in place? And what was done to notify the residents and businesses that don't go to, or even know about those meetings?

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Actually, not being notified or being knowledgeable may be possible. The city does not dispatch people to flyer neighborhoods for such meetings. They may place something in local papers but there is no set rule for that. In my area I have learned 2nd and 3rd hand about community meetings for things such as parking, traffic, or development that would have impacted my interests and neighborhood. When I attend such meetings I have been critical of city staff who usually give the stock reply, that they will "try harder".

Indeed I learned about one such meeting from a personal Facebook page out of sheer luck and found the city transportation department had not even posted anything in local papers. It was left to the proponents of the issue to pass the word. Of course, if said group wants to control access to facilitate a desired outcome, that is entirely possible, and it has happened in some parts of the city.

If the business in question has a problematic relationship with locals over parking, it is entirely possible their business was skipped by those who would have walked flyers around. Quite often such flyers are made the responsibility of issue proponents such as special interest groups or neighborhood associations who in turn take on responsibility of passing the word to get people interested in attending said meeting.

This can also flag just how engaged in community interests such businesses may be, either positive or negative.

So let's not be too quick to jump on the bandwagon that a business or any individual was or should have been informed - or not. There are very prominent gaps in the system associated with public outreach and input.

In fact, there are some things I might not know about unless I saw it here on U-Hub!

Many thanks to Adam!

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Mrs. DiCenso needs to be attending the neighborhood council meetings on a regular basis. She would know about potential problems from the complaints brought before the board. If you are not part of the solution, you are likely part of the problem.

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what FB page did she post her rant? I don't see it on either the restaurant page or the EHCA page.

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It was on the east boston open discussion fb page

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Why should the customers of Rino's come before the residents that live on that street?
The customers will have to circle the block and walk just like we have been doing for years.
I can not wait to see the signs up!

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Why should *anyone* come before anyone else?

But these new rules do just that. They give the vast majority of parking to residents. 24/7. Nonresidents can't park even for 5 minutes in these spaces, and will have to compete for a few 2-hour spots which might not be where they're going, and can also be used by residents.

In other cities, there's at least an attempt to make things more equitable, with rules requiring a certain percentage of spaces left unrestricted, allowing short-term nonresident parking in all spaces, and including business owners and other nonresident stakeholders in the process.

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Um... because they live there?

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That shouldn't give them the right to restrict the use of PUBLIC streets.

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They pay property taxes for those streets which visitors do not.

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Explain?

Are their taxes earmarked specifically for parking on their street? Or do they go into city and state coffers?

You make it sound like they are paying a specific neighborhood-level levy for that parking. I sincerely doubt it.

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Owners of commercial property pay a heck of a lot more real estate taxes than residents.

And why should it matter?

If you want to adopt a fee-for-service model for street parking, fine, then sell permits to anyone who pays.

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That is not a convincing argument.

Um... because they work there?

Um... because they spend a night or two a week there, but live elsewhere?

Um... because they shop at local businesses?

Um... because they're caring for an elderly relative who lives there?

Um... because they like to take a walk in the area?

There are a lot of reasons why people park in various places. Why is it fair for the city to give exclusive use of a public resource to certain people?

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I am very happy about resident parking is coming. After working all day it will be nice not to have to keep circling the block because Rino's customers took up most of the parking. I bet the owners of Rino's would hate to circle there block after working all day too. Oh wait, they don't have to they don't even live in East Boston.

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The people working at Rino's do have to travel to East Boston every day.

It would be nice for Rino's employees if all street spaces were banned to residents, so Rino's employees wouldn't have to keep circling the block because residents took up all the parking. But that would be unfair. Exactly in the same way that resident parking is unfair.

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someone own a business in a neighborhood or town where they don't live! The nerve some people have!

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Was looking at streetview and noticed this crazy-ass parking spot across the street

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3781287,-71.031849,3a,75y,269.17h,64.96t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sLA3xeddGhQWB4P6meX1npg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

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and this woman has never attended. The residents should not have to put up with people parking in our neighborhood so they can avoid paying for airport parking, then leave their car on a street for a week. People from Chelsea come over and park so they can take the T to work. There are plenty of spots a block from the restaurant that will be two hour, except for residents. The parking in Eagle Hill should be for the people that live there. With every new development proposed, people squeal if there isn't enough onsite parking because the parking situation is so bad. There had been block by block petitions to remedy the situation, but it wasn't effective in addressing the parking issue. The owners of Rino's will not see their business hurt due to someone having to walk a block up from Bennington Street after parking their car. Plus, all the public schools allow use of the parking lots after hours, and there is a school lot a block from the restaurant.

As it is, I have seen people who have lived in the neighborhood for years but keep their registration in NH, CT or even Utah. Either register your car in MA or get rid of it.

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If Rino's customers can walk up from spaces on Bennington which always exist, why can't residents?

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which is that people from out of the city and state park cars in the neighborhood long term while flying out of Logan. People who work late and get home in the middle of the night have to park up to 1/2 mile from their home and fear for their safety. There will be no impact on the business at Rino's.

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But perfectly OK for a local resident to do the same thing. Not buying this 'solution.'

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Then the side streets could be all resident parking, while the main streets can all be 2 hr parking from 8am-11pm.

Commuters and Logan people could not park in either, which I think makes sense to most people. Restaurant customers would be covered.

Restaurant staff still gets screwed. I'm not sure how to fix that; it's a similar problem in every neighborhood.

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If long-term parking is the problem, then enact a 24- or 48-hour limit.

That would affect residents as well. But a resident car that doesn't move for 3 weeks causes the same exact problem as a nonresident car.

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The city badly needs to reform the way it values public parking spaces. They give out residents permits for free (yeah yeah taxes yada yada). They charge $1.25 an hour for parking meters. They charge $1600 a year for a dedicated 40 foot valet zone. To get a moving permit the city charges $100 a day for a spot whether you're in Back Bay or in West Roxbury.

Compare that to downtown parking garages which charge ~$12 an hour, and deeded parking spaces that sell for as much as $300,000, equivalent to a $2,000 mortgage payment.

This neglected and fragmented cost structure throws supply and demand totally out of whack and gives no hope of finding equilibrium in the future.

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IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/ZX00qjy.jpg)

the most insidious of happenings in monopoly was in front of us all along

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Who can even get a reservation there??? better parking is needed.

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So not being a resident of Eastie, my takeaway from this discussion is: what the hell is Rino's and is it really that good that people are driving from all over to eat there?? I only know KO Pies in Eastie, but I'm always up for something I haven't tried yet.

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but like Mike's Pastry in the North End, over-hyped. KO is great because it is different and a fabulous location. I've had better Italian at Monica's Trattoria in the North End.

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Thanks! I'll check out Rino's with measured expectations.
On the parking matter -- doesn't bother me to drive around and around looking for parking if I have to drive (as opposed to walking) to a business/ restaurant ...nothing is worse than Chicago parking which I put up with for years. As a Boston resident who lives near a busy tourist area and not too far from Fenway, definitely in favor of residential parking.

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As a home owner and resident of Eagle Hill, I cannot wait for permit parking! It is frustrating (and sometimes scary) not being able to find a parking spot on my block in the evenings. It is also frustrating to see a business publicly attack neighbors on Facebook who want resident parking for their neighborhood, IMO. Their needs are greater than the thousands who actually live on Eagle Hill?

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Contrary to what the socialist like to tell everyone, even East Boston residents like to drive. Don't make the same mistake as other sections of the City that allowed rampant overdevelopment without any parking.

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It's about time Boston made a few adjustments to their permit parking program.

For one, the permits should cost something - even if it's just the cost of making the sticker and the staffing costs around issuing them. Somerville's are now $40, which I feel is too high, but $10 for your first permit, $25 for your second, and $100 for your third should cut down on those who keep multiple vehicles on city streets.

Secondly, there needs to be a grace period for short-term visitors (pizza men, florists, inspectors, realtors, etc). Allow 1 hour parking for anyone, 2 hour parking with a permit from another section of Boston, and unlimited parking in your zone.

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Florists get free parking for an hour?? Huh? I don't get it. You must live in a pretty damn wealthy neighborhood if you have that many florists in need of making deliveries to you and your neighbors. Good for you though!

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My thing is this parking restriction is forcing out of state cars to register . This process is long and its a lot of money. I'm only living in East Boston until the fall of 2017 and I just signed a new lease it would be pointless for me to change me plates on my car since I'll be moving out of Massachusetts after I graduate . I'm just a temporary resident and my right to park my car anywhere and anytime I want is being infringed . I can understand some streets but really all streets . If everyone got the sticker we would still have a parking issue . Fact of the matter is I shouldn't have to be forced to change my plates. I think this ordinance is discriminatory to outsiders. Plus I was never giving any notice about these changes . I just think it's unfair that a small minority thought it was a good idea not to try to inform more people

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My thing is this parking restriction is forcing out of state cars to register.

So?

You live in Massachusetts, you should register your car here. Pretty much end of story. Why shouldn't you have to pay the same taxes and fees as the rest of us slobs?

Maybe there should be some sort of exception for people who are only here for a short period of time (and, in fact, I think there is, at least in terms of changing your plates, if not getting a residential parking permit), but you I'm not getting why you should be exempt from something all your neighbors have to pay otherwise, especially since you're going to be here for another 18 months.

And you better hope you don't get into any serious accidents between now and fall, 2017, because you'd have some explaining to do to both your insurance company and the police.

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